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UAE: Full list of rules for vaccinated residents travelling to France

Dhanusha Gokulan (Principal Correspondent)/Dubai
dhanusha@khaleejtimes.com Filed on June 7, 2021
Supplied photo

Travellers must have taken jabs that were approved by the European Medicines Agency.


Starting June 9, fully vaccinated UAE residents will be able to fly to France for a holiday, an official with the country’s tourism development agency confirmed to Khaleej Times.

However, French borders will be open only to those who took jabs that were approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and these include Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, and Johnson and Johnson.

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“Non-vaccinated travellers will have to justify their purpose of travel by stating any one of the compelling reasons established by French authorities. Both types of travellers will have to undergo PCR tests,” said Karim Mekachera, regional director of Atout France Middle East, France’s tourism development agency.

In the UAE, four types of vaccines are being administered to residents: Pfizer-BioNTech, Sinopharm, Sputnik V and AstraZeneca.

Since the EMA is yet to recognise the Sinopharm and Sputnik V jabs, travellers who have proof of these two vaccines won’t be able to travel to France for leisure or tourism purposes, said Mekachera.

“While it is a different story for French nationals, non-French and EU citizens who have taken Sinopharm or Sputnik V need to have a compelling reason to travel,” he explained. Non-vaccinated travellers must undergo seven days of self-isolation upon arrival as well.

Fully vaccinated travellers will have to submit proof of their jabs and a negative result from a PCR test taken less than 72 hours prior to boarding or a negative antigen test taken less than 48 hours before the flight.

The same policy applies to children below 18 years old.

“A negative PCR test will be needed while leaving the country. France is one of the only countries in the world that provide free PCR tests,” Mekachera said.

“French destinations, hotels and tourist attractions are ready to welcome travellers from the Middle East in the best conditions while respecting sanitary measures,” he said.

“We are aware of the urge of Middle Eastern tourists to travel back to Europe, and historically, France is one of the most privileged destinations for Middle Eastern travellers. We are looking forward to welcoming them,” he said.

Rules for fully vaccinated residents

The French government has said the proof of vaccination is only valid if it can attest to a complete vaccination schedule, which are:

> Two weeks after the 2nd shot for dual-injection vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca)

> Four weeks after the jab for vaccines with a single injection (Johnson & Johnson)

> Two weeks after injecting vaccines for people with a previous history of contracting Covid-19 (only one injection required)

*They will also have to submit a negative result from a PCR test taken less than 72 hours prior to boarding or a negative antigen test taken less than 48 hours before the flight

Rules for non-vaccinated travellers

Travellers who have not been vaccinated must have a compelling reason* to enter France. They could be French citizens, citizens of the EU, citizens of a third country who are holders of a valid French or European residence permit or long-stay visa, or healthcare professionals contributing towards Covid-19 research, among others.

The travellers must:

> Present a negative PCR test taken less than fewer than 72 hours or a negative antigen test taken less than 48 hours before boarding

> Undergo a random antigen test upon arrival in France

> Complete a seven-day of self-isolation upon arrival in France.

*List of compelling reasons accepted by the French government

> French citizen, and their spouse and their children

> Citizen of the European Union or equivalent, and their spouse and their children, whose primary residence is in France or who are returning, in transit through France, to their primary residence in a European Union country or equivalent or to a country whose nationality they hold

> Citizen of a third country who is a holder of a valid French or European residence permit or long-stay visa, who has their main residence in France or who is returning, in transit through France, to their primary residence in a European Union country or equivalent

> British citizens and members of their family

> Citizen of a third country holding a long-stay visa issued for family reunion or reunification of refugee families, beneficiaries of subsidiary protection and stateless persons

> Health or research professional contributing to the fight against Covid-19 as well as her/his spouse and her/his children

> Foreign health or research professional recruited as an associate trainee

> A third-country citizen with a ‘talent passport LSV, as well as her/his spouse and children

> Students enrolled in French as a foreign language (FLE) courses before enrollment in higher education or admitted to the oral examinations in French higher education institutions or registered for the start of the 2021-2022 school year; Researcher settling in France at the invitation of a research laboratory, for research activities which imperatively require a physical presence as well as spouse and children

> Land, sea and air transport sector workers or transport service providers, including drivers of vehicles carrying goods intended for use in the territory, as well as those who are only in transit or travelling as passengers returning to their home base or for training purposes

> Foreign citizen working for a diplomatic or consular mission, or an international organisation with its headquarters or an office in France, as well as their spouse and their children or a foreign citizen of a third country staying in France for a compelling professional reason under a mission order issued by their country of origin

> Traveller in transit in the international zone for less than 24 hours

dhanusha@khaleejtimes.com

author

Dhanusha Gokulan

Originally from India, Dhanusha Gokulan has been working as a journalist for over ten years. For Khaleej Times, she covers NRI affairs, civil aviation, and immigration issues among other things. She completed her BA in Journalism, Economics and English Literature from Mangalore University in 2008 and is currently pursuing her MA in Leadership and Innovation in Contemporary Media at the American University in Dubai. In her spare time, she dabbles with some singing/songwriting, loves food, and is mom to an over-enthusiastic Labrador retriever. Tweet at her @shootsprintrite.





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