Couple stand trial for issuing dud cheques in UAE 'by mistake'

 

The defendant said the cheques were supposed to be a “guarantee” for a partnership between her and the plaintiff.- Alamy Image
The defendant said the cheques were supposed to be a "guarantee" for a partnership between her and the plaintiff.- Alamy Image

Ras Al Khaimah - Court records showed that the defendants "intentionally wrote" two bad cheques for their former business partner.

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Published: Tue 18 Jun 2019, 7:00 PM

Last updated: Tue 18 Jun 2019, 9:23 PM

An Arab couple stood trial at the Ras Al Khaimah Misdemeanour Court for issuing dud cheques.
Court records showed that the defendants "intentionally wrote" two bad cheques for their former business partner.
The man allegedly wrote the cheque amount in numbers and his wife completed the remaining details. However, the woman wrote a different amount in words, the RAK prosecution told the court.
When she was questioned, the defendant claimed it was a mistake and she did not mean to change the value of the cheques.
"It was my first time to issue a cheque," she said, adding that she was able to fill out the second cheque with the correct details.
"I do not even remember when I wrote the two cheques for my husband," she said.
The defendant said the cheques were supposed to be a "guarantee" for a partnership between her and the plaintiff.
"The partnership has expiered for more than two years now, and so the cheques are now useless," she said. "This is nothing but a vexatious litigation."
The defence lawyer told the court that "aside from the fact that the partnership was ended amicably, there was no criminal intention behind the cheque".
He said the bank account of the defendants showed enough balance to cover the amount of the cheques.
"The plaintiff claimed they were not covered, and that is not true. The cheques were dated for collection over two years back.
"The wife, in good faith, was only helping her husband to issue the cheque and never meant to make a mistake," the lawyer said.
ahmedshaaban@khaleejtimes.com



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