Aid agencies in a fix amid new exodus

Aid agencies in a fix amid new exodus

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights has said that hundreds have been killed in skirmishes.



A new wave of exodus from Syria is acting as a detriment as delegates join their heads for talks in Geneva. Reports say fresh clashes near Aleppo have forced people to migrate towards the Turkish borders. But these dispossessed souls have not been able to cross the frontier. More than 20,000 people are stranded in freezing temperature, as rebels and the state security forces fight on for the strategic city in northern Syria.
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights has said that hundreds have been killed in skirmishes. Syrian forces are duly taking advantage of Russian air power onslaught to push back the rebels in Aleppo province, which has led them to regain the control of Ratyan.
The question is what will be the fate of these displaced people? Turkey is not taking in anymore as it already hosts more than two million Syrians. While it is under pressure to ensure that the refugees do not venture into the high seas, in an attempt to crossover into Europe, Ankara is literally in a fix. Human rights groups, however, believe that abandoning people on the international frontiers with no access to basic amenities of life is tantamount to genocide.
Syria's internal displacement and food crisis is already a major issue for aid agencies, who have not been able to gain access to the warzones owing to self-proclaimed embargoes by feuding sides. The United Nations had repeatedly called for providing access to aid groups, but all such calls have fallen on deaf ears. It is incumbent upon all the parties in Geneva to agree on ceasing hostilities and begin the process of nation building.


More news from OPINION
KT Long Read: Watch this space

Opinion

KT Long Read: Watch this space

Major disruptions in the global space industry, including in India that recently liberalised the sector, are heralding an emergence of a whole new world: ramifications will be wide-ranging, high-yielding — and ultimately benefit humanity

Opinion1 week ago