Covid-19: Switzerland lifts all restrictions for UAE travellers; no masks, no PCR tests required

Travellers will also no longer need to fill out entry forms or show a vaccine certificate



Reuters file
Reuters file
by

Dhanusha Gokulan

Published: Fri 18 Feb 2022, 8:37 AM

The Swiss government has lifted the majority of its measures put in place to contain the coronavirus pandemic, Khaleej Times has learnt.

Travellers from the UAE need not fill out entry forms, show a vaccine certificate, or provide a PCR test when entering Switzerland. Moreover, face masks do not need to be worn in public and when entering shops and restaurants.

The rules have been in effect from February 17. The same rules apply for most GCC countries, as well.

Those who test positive must still isolate, and masks should still be worn on public transport and in healthcare settings until the end of March.

“The move signals Switzerland’s return to normal as the Covid situation in the country develops positively, and the healthcare system is not deemed at risk of becoming overwhelmed,” said Massimo Baggi, ambassador of Switzerland to the UAE and Bahrain.

The decision was taken after consultation by the Swiss Federal Council, whereby a clear majority of respondents came out in favour of lifting most of the remaining measures with immediate effect.

April 1 is set to mark the end of all special circumstances, providing the epidemiological situation continues to evolve as expected, explained Baggi.

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He added: “As the epidemiological situation in Switzerland continues to develop positively, this is another significant step towards finally letting visitors freely explore our country once again. We look forward to welcoming many tourists from the region to Switzerland in the upcoming months.”

Matthias Albrecht, director GCC, Switzerland Tourism, said: “This is a fantastic development and we are absolutely thrilled that visitors from the UAE can freely travel to Switzerland as before.”

dhanusha@khaleejtimes.com


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