These 10 healthy choices can save us from the pandemic

We all need to be on the same page and to understand what is required to help get us through this terrible pandemic with less suffering and fewer deaths



By David Susman

Published: Wed 29 Jul 2020, 12:48 PM

Last updated: Wed 29 Jul 2020, 2:51 PM

As the pandemic rages on, it's becoming increasingly clear that the choices we make can have dire consequences. Not practicing social distancing, not wearing a mask, and being in crowded hot spots are all unwise choices which increase our risk of being infected and infecting others. Once infected, some will not survive this virus.
However, we can also make several simple and effective choices to keep ourselves and others healthy. By making these choices, we can limit the transmission of the virus and flatten the curve to slow the pandemic.
At a minimum, we all need to be on the same page and to understand what is required to help get us through this terrible pandemic with less suffering and fewer deaths. Think of it this way. We are being asked to make several changes in our behavior. Granted, many of these changes are new to us and not yet automatic. But there was a time when wearing a seat belt, putting a child in a car seat, or putting on sunscreen were also new behaviors.
But we have learned to make those changes consistently and we can learn to make the changes that are now asked of us. In that spirit, here is my list of 10 of the most important healthy choices we need to make right now to keep ourselves and others safe.
Wear a mask. Wearing a mask when you're around others or in any public space can greatly reduce the transmission of the virus, protecting both you and others.
Wash your hands. Wash your hands frequently, and every time you return from being out in public. Use soap and water. Use hand sanitizer when soap and water aren't available.
Clean and disinfect surfaces. Regularly clean "high touch" surfaces (light switches, door knobs, kitchen counters, inside your car), using a disinfectant that kills viruses and bacteria.
Observe physical distancing. Keep at least 6 feet (8 feet is even better) between you and others, even if wearing a mask. 
Avoid known hot spots. Now is definitely not the time to go to a crowded beach, bar, or large gathering.
Protect vulnerable individuals. Since you may not know if you are infected, assume you could be and don't expose vulnerable people who are at higher risk for sickness or death.
Get tested. Monitor yourself for possible symptoms and get tested so you will know if you are infected and contagious.
Reach out to help others. People are struggling in many ways besides sickness from the virus, such as financial stress, grief and loss, mental health challenges, parenting and caregiver fatigue, and social isolation.
Seek reliable information. As conditions keep changing rapidly, it's critical to stay informed. Go to reliable sources like the CDC, WHO, local and state government websites and reputable news media.
Be a role model. Show others through your words, attitude and behaviors that you are committed to do the right thing to keep yourself, friends and family safe. -Psychology Today


More news from OPINION
Female leaders are just leaders; they’re not ‘girlbosses’

Opinion

Female leaders are just leaders; they’re not ‘girlbosses’

At a time when the world was only starting to see the emergence of powerful female leaders who spoke passionately about leaning in, being your own role model and asking for what you want, Amoruso’s words were a source of inspiration. But now, it’s not so hard to realise that the girlboss culture has set unrealistic standards for women.

Opinion1 week ago

Covid has taught us to be grateful

Opinion

Covid has taught us to be grateful

Psychologists have found that negative events have a greater impact on our brains than positive ones, referred to as the negative bias. As a result, a lot of people tend to move farther away from gratitude, which is an essential precursor to happiness.

Opinion1 week ago