How to be an ideal Instagram partner

How to be an ideal Instagram partner

Travel influencer Michelle Karam on how to click the perfect photo when on the move



You're travelling with your friends to Paris to celebrate a momentous occasion. You know you're going to stop by all the main spots with the sole purpose of getting those Instagrammable photos you've set your heart on. How can you make sure you're ready when your friend turns to you to ask the inevitable, "Could you take my picture?" You only have a few seconds to beat the crowd and capture that moment. We all agree that it takes more than just a quick click of your camera or small tap on the screen to get that perfect shot. Often, Instagram heroes rarely get the public credit they deserve for a job well done. RSA brings you the top five tips on being the best Instagram partner, courtesy leading travel influencer Michelle Karam.
All about the angles
It's important to take note of the surroundings and, sometimes, the best picture comes from not being afraid to experiment with angles. Think Eiffel Tower from the bottom up. Pay attention to lines and layout of the frame to make use of every element around you. A literal picture of the same landmark can become redundant. Get your subject to interact in a fun or interesting way within the frame. Tell a story and take multiple shots, as a simple eye roll or hand movement can make the photo unusable.
Framing
Usually, a sign of a good photographer comes from composition. Photography 101 says to always consider "The Rule of Thirds": visualise your photo getting split vertically into three frames and position the subject either on far left or far right. Putting the subject at the centre is considered amateur photography and is avoidable. A pro tip: ask your partner about the exact framing they're looking for by taking the frame first. Alternatively, you can ask them to share references from Instagram or Pinterest to understand the style of photography they are looking for.
Lighting
Getting the right lighting can flatter or ruin an image - remember those red eyes? Overhead lighting is usually a "no-go". Natural lighting is the best option with an emphasis on the 'Golden Hour', a period right before sunrise or sunset during which the sunlight is softer and warmer than when the sun is higher in the sky. Another option is the 'Blue Hour', a period during twilight, when the light is evenly diffused. Both options make for great photos that require little or no editing.
Editing
Speaking of editing, there has been somewhat of a backlash recently over images that use heavy filters as they ruin the authenticity of the actual subject/scene. The hashtag #nofilter has risen in popularity to promote a more realistic approach to portraying ourselves and our settings. However, in order to enhance our photos, some light editing is acceptable. Remember to keep it real when editing the highlights, shadows, vibrancy, and, of course, skin blurring.

Be the voice of reason
We all want to get that perfect shot and are willing to go to extreme lengths to get them in order to stand out and get those comments and likes. Trekking to hard-to-reach locations, staying out later at night to avoid crowds, waking up before sunrise, or enduring uncomfortable conditions to get a better shot are just a few examples. While we can be focused on taking the best travel shots, it is important not to forget ensuring peace of mind. Be that voice of reason for your loved ones and remind them of the importance of taking out travel insurance to protect not just their equipment but also themselves from any harm. That is the surest way of being the best Instagram partner and to always get those picture-perfect moments that you've been looking forward to taking back home.
wknd@khaleejtimes.com


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