Mother seeks help for her baby’s treatment

Mother seeks help for her baby’s treatment

Baby born two months premature has respiratory problems, a possible hemorrhage and severe hyponatremia, which is low-sodium concentration in the blood.



By Bernd Debusmann Jr./senior Reporter

Published: Wed 24 Jun 2015, 1:02 AM

Last updated: Wed 8 Jul 2015, 3:10 PM

Mary’s prematurely-born baby at the GMC Hospital in Ajman . — Supplied photo

Dubai - As the UAE observes the holy month of Ramadan, a young expat mother finds herself worried and desperate, with an ill, prematurely-born baby and mounting medical bills.

Mary Oshiya Kochery Jolly, 28, a contract nurse originally from the Indian state of Kerala, gave birth to a yet-unnamed baby boy on May 23. The baby, however, was born two months premature, with respiratory problems, a possible hemorrhage and severe hyponatremia, which is low-sodium concentration in the blood and is associated with congestive heart, liver and kidney failure and pneumonia. 

Now, nearly a month after the baby’s birth, Mary and her husband, a draftsman, face enormous medical bills with no end in sight and little possibility of being able to pay for continued treatment at GMC Hospital in Ajman.

“I was working before, on contract, but now I can’t, anymore,” she said.

“The treatments are costing about Dh4,000 a day at the moment. We’ve paid Dh40,000 but still owe Dh95,000, as of today.”

“Every day, the doctors are telling us different things,” she added.

“It’s not a normal situation and it’s totally out of our control. The baby will be in the hospital for a week or two more, but we don’t know, it may even be longer.”

Now, Mary hopes that local residents see it in their hearts to help her family during the holy month of Ramadan.

“It is our only option. We’ve reached out to some Islamic organisations, which aren’t working until July after Ramadan,” she said.

 “The hospital didn’t know what to say, and suggested we reach out to the people for help. They said reaching out to the community will help us.”

“The main thing is financial,” she said.

“But just as important, people who pray to God should pray for us. We need help.” - bernd@khaleejtimes.com


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