Volcano Fountain demolished

ABU DHABI — One of the scenic landmarks of the capital, the Volcano Fountain on the corniche (above), has been razed to make space for a more picturesque development as part of the ongoing beautification of the corniche.



By A Staff Reporter

Published: Sun 3 Oct 2004, 9:26 AM

Last updated: Thu 12 Jan 2023, 12:03 PM

The 80-foot-high fountain had been built like a circular pyramid with a flight of steps from the four sides going up the six platforms to the fountain on the top. During evenings the fountain would turn into a pleasant spectacle with coloured lights on as the water cascades down.

For visitors as well as foreign tourist, the volcano used to be a popular spot to be photographed. It was also an all-purpose a rendezvous for everybody. It also provided an opportunity for freelance photographers with their pollarides.

However, once the entire upgrading and beautification of the corniche is over, visitors will see a more spectacular surroundings running from the Sheraton to the Hilton and are sure to forget the Volcano fountain.


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