WATCH: Why is Australia killing almost 2000 kangaroos?

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WATCH: Why is Australia killing almost 2000 kangaroos?

Melbourne - The announcement was made on its annual measure to control the kangaroo population.

By Web Report

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Published: Sun 15 May 2016, 10:21 AM

Last updated: Sun 15 May 2016, 1:05 PM

Australia will cull over 1,900 kangaroos from Monday across the Australian Capital Territory in a bid to reduce its population. Here's why

10 reserves across the territory will be closed each evening to allow the culling of up to 1,991 animals, ABC news reported. 
"We know for a fact that over-abundant numbers of eastern grey kangaroos can have a devastating impact on the local environment," an ACT official said. 
"It can lead to de-vegetation and the complete degradation of certain areas if we let it go too long. This is not about eradication, this is about sustainable numbers of eastern grey kangaroos," he added. 
A trial is currently underway to test the usefulness of fertility drugs as an alternative method of controlling kangaroo populations. 
The culling of kangaroos will be done across Australian Capital Territory (ACT)
The kill is expected to conclude by August 1. 
Almost 4000 kangaroos have been killed over the past two years as part of the ACTs annual cull. 
Animal rights activists opposing plans to shoot the kangaroos are keeping close guard over some wildlife parks to try and foil the attempt. 
An official said they had explored many options since 1998 to control kangaroo populations, including contraceptive implants, herding and relocation, but those measures had not been effective.

WATCH: Over 1900 kangroos to be culled in Australia


A night on the kangaroo cull

 
A government-licensed kangaroo shooter's job is to take part in the culling of Australia's kangaroo population, which is estimated at over 50 million, though precise numbers vary dramatically. Every licensed kangaroo shooter goes through rigorous testing and must abide by strict rules and conditions, including that a "headshot" must be obtained to minimize the animal's suffering.
Kangaroo shooter Steven O'Donnell rests his .223 calibre rifle on the roof of his truck as he aims at a group of kangaroos on a property located on the outskirts of Australia's capital city Canberra on March, 2013. O'Donnell, a professional plumber, shoots kangaroos on local farmer's properties around three times a week as part of the annual cull, running from March until the end of July, which involves the legal shooting and tagging of thousands of eastern grey kangaroos per year in the Australian Capital Territory. - Reuters

Kangaroo shooter rests his .223 calibre rifle on the window of his truck as he searches for kangaroos on a property located on the outskirts of Australia's capital city Canberra.

Kangaroo shooter aims his spotlight and .223 calibre rifle from the window of his truck at a group of kangaroos in a paddock on a property located on the outskirts of Australia's capital city Canberra.

The shooter Steven O'Donnell bends down to pick up his rifle after tagging a kangaroo he just shot in a paddock.

The shooter bends down to pick up his .223 calibre rifle after tagging a kangaroo he just shot in a paddock on a property located on the outskirts of Canberra.
 
 



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