Kuwait calls for permanent Arab seat in UN Security Council

The Kuwaiti diplomat noted that the issue of reform of the Security Council comes as a fundamental process of comprehensive reform of the UNs’ pillars.



By (Wam)

Published: Sat 14 Feb 2015, 1:30 AM

Last updated: Thu 25 Jun 2015, 9:56 PM

New York: The State of Kuwait has reaffirmed its stance, and that of the Arab group, in support to the UN Security Council reform process, and called for a permanent Arab seat in the council.

The remarks were made by Kuwait’s Permanent Delegate to the UN Mansour Al Otaibi at UN General Assembly session which focused on discussing government negotiations regarding Security Council reform, stressing that the Arab group position was noted many times on various occasions in the past.

According to the Kuwaiti News Agency (Kuna), Al Otaibi added that the keeping the challenges faced by the international community witnessed make it important to intensify efforts and activate role of the Security Council to make it more capable and effective to overcome these challenges through a just representation, in a transparent, impartial and credible atmosphere.

The Kuwaiti diplomat noted that the issue of reform of the Security Council comes as a fundamental process of comprehensive reform of the United Nations’ pillars.

Al Otaibi said that after more than 20 years of discussions aimed to expand the membership of the Security Council and to improve the methods of work punctuated by a number of initiatives and positions by a number of countries and groups of countries, including the Arab Group, it is now important to push forward for reforming the Security Council, especially in the presence of consensus between member states on the principle of change and reform.

He stressed that this does not mean rushing to reach a solution that does not enjoy consensus, adding that what is required is a more effective international organisation to perform a role in maintaining international peace and security, which also means that any solution they seek must have the broadest political support as possible in order to preserve the cohesion of the general membership.


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