Alleged Lockerbie bombmaker in US custody: Scotland

Masud was charged by the US two years ago for Pan Am flight 103 bombing on December 21, 1988, which claimed 270 lives

By AFP

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Floral tributes left at the Memorial Garden in Dryfesdale Cemetery are seen on the morning of the 30th anniversary of the bombing of Pan Am flight 103 which exploded over the Scottish town on December 21, 1988, killing 259 passengers and crew and 11 residents on the ground in Lockerbie, Scotland, Britain. — Reuters file
Floral tributes left at the Memorial Garden in Dryfesdale Cemetery are seen on the morning of the 30th anniversary of the bombing of Pan Am flight 103 which exploded over the Scottish town on December 21, 1988, killing 259 passengers and crew and 11 residents on the ground in Lockerbie, Scotland, Britain. — Reuters file
Unidentified crash investigators inspect the nose section of the crashed Pan Am flight 103 in a field near Lockerbie, Scotland, Dec. 23, 1988. — AP file
Unidentified crash investigators inspect the nose section of the crashed Pan Am flight 103 in a field near Lockerbie, Scotland, Dec. 23, 1988. — AP file

Published: Sun 11 Dec 2022, 6:43 PM

A Libyan man accused of making the bomb that destroyed a Pan Am flight over Scotland in 1988 is now in US custody, Scottish prosecutors said on Sunday.

Abu Agila Mohammad Masud was charged by the US two years ago for the Lockerbie bombing. He had previously been held in Libya for his alleged involvement in a 1986 attack on a Berlin nightclub.


Only one individual has so far been prosecuted for the bombing of Pan Am flight 103 on December 21, 1988, which claimed 270 lives.

Former Libyan intelligence officer Abdelbaset Ali Mohmet Al Megrahi spent seven years in a Scottish prison after his conviction in 2001.


He died in Libya in 2012, always maintaining his innocence.

"The families of those killed in the Lockerbie bombing have been told that the suspect Abu Agila Mohammad Masud Kheir Al Marimi ... is in US custody," a spokesperson for Scotland's Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service said.

"Scottish prosecutors and police, working with UK government and US colleagues, will continue to pursue this investigation, with the sole aim of bringing those who acted along with aAl Megrahi to justice."

There was no further information given on when Masud was handed over, and his fate has been tied up in the warring factionalism of Libyan politics.

He was kidnapped by a Libyan militia group, according to reports last month cited by the BBC, following his detention for the Berlin attack which killed two US soldiers and a Turkish citizen.

Masud was reputedly a leading bombmaker for Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi. According to the US indictment, he assembled and programmed the bomb that brought down the Pan Am jumbo jet.

The investigation was relaunched in 2016 when Washington learned of his arrest after Kadhafi's ouster and death in 2011, and his reported confession of involvement to the new Libyan regime in 2012.

However, the Libyan connection to Lockerbie has long been disputed by some.

In January 2021, Megrahi's family lost a posthumous appeal in Scotland against his conviction, following an independent review that said a possible miscarriage of justice may have occurred.

The family wants UK authorities to declassify documents that are said to allege that Iran used a Syria-based Palestinian proxy to build the bomb that downed flight 103.

In that narrative, the Lockerbie bombing was retaliation for the downing of an Iranian passenger jet by a US Navy missile in July 1988 that killed 290 people.


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