Businessman fined over Dh230,000 for over-speeding

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Businessman fined over Dh230,000 for over-speeding

Finland - Reima Kuisla's declared income was 6.5 million euros per year and hence he was fined such a hefty amount.

By Web Report

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Published: Tue 26 Dec 2017, 11:49 AM

Last updated: Tue 26 Dec 2017, 7:40 PM

This may sound unbelievable but a Finnish businessman was fined 54,000 euros ($64,000 and Dh235,040) after he was recently caught driving at 65 miles per hour in a 50mph zone in Finland. And, the extreme fine was not an error on the part of the traffic authorities. Instead, in Finland some traffic fines, as well as fines for shoplifting and violating securities-exchange laws, are based on an offender's earnings.
Reima Kuisla's declared income was 6.5 million euros per year and hence he was fined such a hefty amount.
Though exorbitant fines like this are infrequent, there are records which show such fines are not unheard of. In 2002, a Nokia executive was fined the equivalent of $103,000 for going 45 in a 30 zone on his motorcycle, and NHL player Teemu Selanne incurred a $39,000 fine two years earlier.
"This is no constitutionally governed state," one Finn who was fined nearly $50,000 moaned to The Wall Street Journal.
Finland calculates fines according to an estimate of the amount of spending money a Finn has for one day, and then divides that by two - the resulting number is considered a reasonable amount of spending money to deprive the offender of.
Then, based on the severity of the crime, the system has rules for how many days the offender must go without that money. Going about 15 mph over the speed limit gets you a multiplier of 12 days, and going 25 mph over carries a 22-day multiplier.
Most reckless drivers pay between euro30 and euro50 per day, for a total of about euro400 oreuro500. Finland's maximum multiplier is 120 days, but there's no ceiling on the fines themselves-the fine is taken as a constant proportion of income whether you make euro80,000 a year or 800,000 euros.
The report published in The Atlantic surfaced on the internet only recently, creating quite a buzz on social media.



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