Too Hot To Handle?

Too Hot To Handle?

A restaurant, cafe or nightclub which shall not be named in Iceland, Belgium or the US caught fire, got sucked up in a tornado.



By Mukul Sharma

Published: Thu 18 Feb 2016, 11:00 PM

Last updated: Fri 19 Feb 2016, 8:29 AM

E4
Either recently or many, many years ago, a restaurant, cafe or nightclub which shall not be named (so that you can't Wiki or Google it) in Iceland, Belgium or the US caught fire, got sucked up in a tornado or was swept away by a flash flood in which over 200, 300 or 400 people died. (Not bad, no?) Anyway, a simple design flaw in the building led to the death toll being so high. Subsequently, regulations were changed to ensure that all public buildings throughout the concerned country in which it happened eliminated this one detail that proved so deadly. What do you think it was?
I have this sinking feeling someone will still find a way to cheat this off the iNet and get it and then never be able to forgive him or herself for being dishonest. Therefore in order not to tempt such weak people, there's something else waiting for them in the Endgame section. 
DEAR MS
(The problem was: "List four ways of measuring the height of a six-storey building with a medical thermometer. Five ways would be even better." - MS)
 
Multi-Storied-Solution Dept:
(1) Tie a string to the thermo-meter, lower it from the roof of the skyscraper to the ground. Then measure the length of the string plus the length of the thermometer. (2) Take the thermometer to the roof and drop it and measure the time it takes to reach the ground. (3) Measure the height of the thermometer, then set it on end and measure the length of its shadow. Then you measure the length of the skyscraper's shadow, and thereafter it is a simple matter of proportional arithmetic. (4) If you wanted to be highly scientific, you could tie a short piece of string to the thermometer and swing it as a pendulum, first at ground level, then on the roof of the skyscraper. The height of the building can be calculated from the difference in the pendulum's period. (5) Walk up the staircase and mark off the height in thermometer lengths.
- Ajit Athle, ?ajitathle@gmail.com 
(The other problem was: "There are eight balls numbered from 1 to 8 put into an urn. They are then drawn at random and placed in ?the sequence they are drawn, from left to right, thereby forming an eight-digit number. What is the probability that this number is divisible by 9?" - MS) 
Nine-Fours-Are-36 Dept:
The sum of eight numbers from 1 to 8 is 36 and 36 is divisible by 9 if these numbers are arranged in any order forming an eight digit number. So the probability for this is always 100 per cent.
- Aliasgar Fakruddin Rampurwala, ?aliasgar521@hotmail.com
The answer is the probability is 1. That is, the number will always be divisible by 9 no matter what order it is arranged in because the numbers add up to 36 which is divisible by 9.
- Ananya Jaishankar, aynana2001@gmail.com 
(The last problem was: "What's a common unit of measure that's also twice what it is defined, according to the dictionary, to be equal to?" - MS) 
Day-For-Night Dept:
"Day" is usually treated as a unit of time measured as 24 hours. It also means a 12-hour time period, during which the sun can be seen.
- Chandrasekhar Karri, ?karri.kmds@gmail.com 
The answer is "second" as in "one second" where second is two times of first(one).
- Adwait Kasar, adwait.kasar@gmail.com 
ENDGAME(S)
1.Obviously the torque was dependent on its position, with the maximum being at 12 and 6 o'clock and the minimum at 3 and 9 o'clock positions. Equally obviously, when the locomotive came to a halt, the driver had no way of telling what its terminal position was. How then did it get a starting torque if it had halted exactly at the 3 or 9 o'clock positions?
2.Why does the flame of a candle always point in an upwards direction no matter how the candle itself is placed?
(To get in touch with Mukul, mail him at ?mukul.mindsport@gmail.com)


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