'The Art of War talks about principles that are relevant to the modern world': Myriam Petit

The Art of War talks about principles that are relevant to the modern world: Myriam Petit

Published: Thu 7 Dec 2017, 11:00 PM

Last updated: Fri 8 Dec 2017, 1:00 AM

What book(s) are you reading?
I tend to read at night to relax my mind. At the moment, I am reading three books. Given that I am six months pregnant, I started reading What to Expect When You Are Expecting. Book number 2 is Belly Laughs by Jenny McCarthy - a gift from a friend who found it hilarious. I have to say it is a very easy read that takes the pressure of pregnancy off. Book number 3 is my rescue to all the pregnancy overload. I am a big fan of Steve Jobs, and hence reading Inside Steve's Brain by Leander Kahney, a fascinating book on how Jobs turned his personality into a business philosophy.
A book that changed your life?
Multipliers by Liz Wiseman. It's a great management read on how to make the people you work with smarter and allow them to reach their full potential. We've all had experience with two dramatically different types of leaders. The first type drains intelligence, energy and capability from the people around them and always needs to be the smartest person in the room. On the other side of the spectrum are leaders who use their intelligence to amplify the smarts and capabilities of the people around them. These are the leaders who inspire employees to stretch themselves to deliver results that surpass expectations. These are the multipliers, and the world needs more of them.

Your favourite literary character?
It will have to be Anne Shirley of Anne of Green Gables. She is smart, ambitious, imaginative, competitive, caring and strong at the same time. Plus, she can pull off red hair. She has flaws but that makes her more lovable. Great read.
A book quote that really stood out - and what it means to you.
"The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting" - The Art of War by Sun Tzu. This book tells you all about winning battles by looking at opportunities rather than shedding blood. It's an ancient book with principles that are still relevant in the modern world.




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