UAE has tough laws to protect child laws

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UAE has tough laws to protect child laws
Any sort of breach of aforementioned provisions of law by the children or their relatives is a criminal offence in the UAE.

Dubai - In the UAE, matters of parental negligence are dealt with through UAE Federal Law No. 3 of 2016, more popularly known as the Wadeema Law.

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A Staff Reporter

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Published: Sat 23 Sep 2017, 7:04 PM

Last updated: Sat 23 Sep 2017, 9:07 PM

 
Cases of parental neglect can lead to heavy fines and even imprisonment as per the UAE's strict laws, according to Ashish Mehta, founder and managing partner of the Dubai-based Ashish Mehta and Associates. 
"Parental negligence against a child is an alarming issue as more matters of parental negligence come to light," Mehta told Khaleej Times. "Time and again, the UAE government has set an example to lead from the front by introducing laws to protect everyone." 
This time, in 2016, the UAE government again demonstrated to the international community their concern to protect a child from any form of abuse and accordingly introduced a special law to protect a child against all sorts of crimes against a child including but not limited to parental negligence," he added.
In the UAE, matters of parental negligence are dealt with through UAE Federal Law No. 3 of 2016, more popularly known as the Wadeema Law. The law is named in memory of Wadeema, an eight-year-old Emirati girl who was brutally tortured to death by her father and another suspect in 2012. 
"The parental negligence may be treated as exploitation, emotional or physical abuse," Mehta explained.
Article (2)(2) of the Wadeema law states that 'the competent authority and the concerned entities shall achieve the following: protect the child from all forms of negligence, exploitation and abuse from any physical and psychological violence (that) exceeds the religiously and legally recognised as a right of the parents and the equivalents to discipline their sons."
Additionally, Mehta noted that Article 36 of the Wadeema Law noted that "the child is prohibited from exposure to torture or abuse of its physical safety or otherwise conducting any work, involving cruelty which may influence the child's emotional, psychological, mental or moral balance."
"Any sort of breach of aforementioned provisions of law by the children or their relatives is a criminal offence in the UAE," Mehta said.
Mehta noted that anyone who violates Article 2 of the Wadeema law shall be fined not less than Dh5,000, in accordance with Article No. 62 of the law. Those who violate Article 36 of the Wadeema law are subject to fines of up to Dh50,000 and prison, in accordance with Article 69 of the law.
"Law enforcement agencies in the UAE may initiate legal proceedings, including criminal proceedings, where applicable, against a parent or any other person accused of negligence, exploitation and abuse and from any physical and psychological violence against the child," Mehta added.
A study conducted by the Dubai Foundation for Women and Children in 2014 has found that 10 per cent of children in the UAE schools were exposed to abuse or violence, mainly outside the home. 
The study on 'Abuse against children in the UAE society' found that 7.2 per cent of male participants were exposed to abuse at home, compared to 5.7 per cent of females. Similarly, more male children were found to be suffering abuse at school (15.1 per cent) than female children (9.3 per cent).
reporters@haleejtimes.com 
 



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