Fasting gives peace to this non-Muslim

Fasting gives peace to this non-Muslim
Fasting usually doesn't demand much effort, says Vysakh. But this year, it was not easy for him.

Ajman - For Vysakh Somarajan, a popular RJ and assistant programme director with a Malayalam FM station in Ajman, Ramadan is a time he eagerly waits for, throughout the year.



by

Anu Warrier

Published: Fri 23 Jun 2017, 8:21 PM

Last updated: Sat 24 Jun 2017, 9:23 AM

Fasting non-Muslims are not rare in this part of the world. But some one who does it for four years without even a day's break during the holy month of Ramadan is not very common, too.
For Vysakh Somarajan, a popular RJ and assistant programme director with a Malayalam FM station in Ajman, Ramadan is a time he eagerly waits for, throughout the year. 
"I started to observe fasting four years back, imitating my friends. In the beginning, it was just for the sake of the thrill to know how they are experiencing it and giving them company. But gradually, it started to change. Now, fasting gives me peace of mind and I get a divine feeling. I feel like getting closer to God," says Vysakh, who is known as RJ Vysakh.
His first fasting came during his school days.
Vysakh says besides the religious face, fasting during Ramadan has a social aspect, too. "In a rich nation like the UAE, we see a lot of people wasting food. But once I started fasting, I realised the value of food and hunger. Actually, my Ramadan fasting helps me to work sincerely with charity campaigns being conducted by our radio station."
Fasting usually doesn't demand much effort, says Vysakh. But this year, it was not easy for him. 
"I start work at 7am, after having Suhoor around 3.30am. This year, as our radio station had a live commentary of ICC Champion's Trophy Cricket matches, I had to work continuously till 5.30pm. Talking continuously without even drinking a glass of water was hard. But I somehow managed it."
It's not just fasting that inspires Vysakh. "I try to learn more about the meaning of fasting and the religion. I am taking efforts to know it better, through books and talking to Islamic scholars. They are always helpful," he adds.
Talking about the Iftars he had all these years, the experience he cherishes in his mind is one he had this year. "It was at a car wash station, where I visit occasionally. This year, they invited me for an Iftar. It was a casual invitation. We always have Iftar gatherings at hotels or other big organisations. But this was entirely different. There were around 35 workers of the car wash station. We all sat together on the floor after spreading paper. It was very simple, but the feeling I had there can't be explained in words."
anuwarrier@khaleejtimes.com
 
 


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