Balooshi chasing Dakar Rally glory

Balooshi chasing Dakar Rally glory
UAE's star rider Mohammed Balooshi.

Dubai - The Dakar Rally will be staged in three South American countries - Peru, Bolivia and Argentina - from January 6 to January 20 in 2018



Published: Mon 4 Dec 2017, 8:11 PM

Last updated: Wed 17 Jan 2018, 5:19 PM

Mohammed Balooshi, the most successful Arab motocross rider in the history of the sport in the GCC, will vie for glory in Dakar Rally, a press release said.
The Dakar Rally will be staged in three South American countries - Peru, Bolivia and Argentina - from January 6 to January 20 in 2018.
The Emirati star rider made all the right moves in the Regional Championships this season after recovering from a knee injury. He earned his Dakar Rally spot after achieving some outstanding results in the World Championship over the last couple of years.
Despite the rally being open to four categories - cars, trucks, motorcycles and quads - the motorcycle class is undoubtedly the most challenging and competitive of them all.
Now Balooshi is highly motivated to make his mark in what is the toughest race on the world.
January 6, the opening day of the rally, will be a special day for the UAE champion as he will be returning to Dakar for the first time after he was forced to retire from the race with a broken wrist in the 2012 event. "I have an unfinished business in the Dakar Rally," said Balooshi.
"I feel super excited about having a second chance at it. This race is beyond extreme, and with the demanding admission process the organisers have in place for the bikes, it's a privilege to be part of it. The biggest plus for me this time is to be able to take the colors of the UAE flag to these remote lands in South America. It's an honour for me," he added.
The 40th Dakar Rally will cover a total of 9,000 kilometres.
"Rally Racing is very demanding. We have very long days of 500km per day of proper racing and, on a bike, without a chassis around your body to protect you, it's important to minimise the mistakes," he said.
"It's challenging because on a bike you're alone, without the help of a co-driver, without a chassis to protect you, riding at 160km per hour through unknown terrain, and you have to keep up with your riding and navigation. The smallest mistake can throw you to the ground and send you home with broken bones. Knowing this, I am prepared to fight," he added.


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