When sleep becomes an industry

Enter the smartphone, wand-like, with an app that lets us know just what went wrong and how to get those hours to give our minds and bodies some rest.

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Published: Wed 11 May 2016, 12:00 AM

Last updated: Wed 11 May 2016, 2:00 AM

Why fuss over sleep? When you're tired you should fall into slumber. Rest assured. Shouldn't it be as simple as that? It's the natural thing for us to when the day is done when the dusk has settled on our toil. But what happens when you're not getting enough day (and by day we mean natural light)? Our night turns shorter. We get less shut eye. Meanwhile, an industry around us is rising and shining, studying our inability to doze off because they cannot shut their eyes to the phenomenon. Research comes up with similar findings year after year. So while our sleepless nights turn into groggy days with sore heads, foul tempers, our work turns into chores and relationships crumble around us. Enter the smartphone, wand-like, with an app that lets us know just what went wrong and how to get those hours to give our minds and bodies some rest. The latest app enabled study has again confirmed what we already knew - that the world faces a sleep deficit and is less happier (and healthier) for it.
There's a yawning gap between hitting the sack and actual conditions on the ground. Society expects us to stay awake to become (and stay) successful. Corporate upstarts are all over the place telling us how they make do with a mere three hours of sleep. The trouble with time spent staying awake is that slumber has been turned into a science. There's a multi-billion dollar industry spending sleepless days and nights tracking our dozing, nodding off patterns and telling us why its important to take that perfect nap that refreshes us and charges our systems to face the day. In the US alone, there were 2,280 sleep labs five years ago, which raked in $5.9 billion. In 2015, there were 2,800 labs who made some $7.1 billion. The sleep lab industry is expected to touch the $10 billion mark by 2020. A small price to pay? Think we'll sleep over it.
 



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