Violent video games aren't the problem. Access to guns is

Violent video games arent the problem. Access to guns is

Those individuals and groups that take up guns to kill innocent people have a mental illness, but mental illness isn't exclusive to the US.



By Vicky Kapur (From the Executive Editor's desk)

Published: Wed 7 Aug 2019, 9:00 PM

Last updated: Thu 8 Aug 2019, 5:08 PM

Statistics often hide more than they reveal. So, when stats show that a majority of mass shooters in the recent times have been found to be addicted to violent games, one's mind immediately wants to draw a causal correlation between video games and aggressive behaviour. The suspect who gunned down 22 in the El Paso Walmart in Texas is believed to have authored an online manifesto mentioning the combat game Call of Duty. That mention, coupled with US President Donald Trump's condemnation, were enough to smother video games shares on the stock markets. "We must stop the glorification of violence in our society," said Trump, adding that "This includes the gruesome and grisly video games that are now commonplace."
It's almost plausible but for the small matter of facts. Let's just talk about the video game already mentioned. I'm not going to get into whether it is violent (it is) but about its popularity. It is immensely popular - the series has sold over 285 million copies till date, with sales revenue topping $17 billion. Even as the US of A is a primary market for it, the game remains immensely popular elsewhere, especially Europe. So why are people in some of the other countries - with more stringent gun laws - not going on a rampage after adopting some skewed cause? One of the primary reasons for that is the lack of easy access to guns that can be used for mass murders.
Those individuals and groups that take up guns to kill innocent people have a mental illness, but mental illness isn't exclusive to the US. Neither is hatred or addiction to video games - violent or otherwise. It is the unhindered access to guns that seems to be the 'exclusive' factor here. The US has more than 120 guns per 100 inhabitants. In South Korea, that ratio is a mere 1.1. More than 100 people die in America every day due to gun-related injuries. In South Korea - which has hundreds of rehab centres for addict gamers - it is 0.9 deaths a day (the whole year doesn't see the number crossing 50). Video games aren't the problem. Access to guns is.


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