Turkey's aggressive foreign policy is sowing chaos

Turkey is setting up militias in Arab countries and stoking instability



by

Mustafa Al Zarooni

Published: Sun 11 Oct 2020, 6:36 AM

Last updated: Sun 11 Oct 2020, 8:38 AM

A country is the sum total of the way it is governed over a long period of time. Political leaders and the policies they champion can set a country on a path of progress or failure. Bad policies, the ones that cater to the selfish interests of leaders rather than people in general, often breed corruption, nepotism, and push the country towards collapse. 
Take the Middle East, for example, where politics has played a significant role in destroying the economies of many countries under the pretext of protecting interests and developing resources. Under the garb of larger good, leaders in some countries had pushed for decisions and policies that brought nothing but destruction to their countries. People were terrorised, and disagreements with neighbours occurred.
To be more specific, look at Turkey. While Arab countries are striving to recover after long conflicts with corruption and ideologies, Turkey adopted another approach. It has been using its power and resources to form militias in Syria, Iraq, and Libya. The Recep Tayyip Erdogan government is now looking at Europe, bullying Greece and trying to trigger a crisis in the Mediterranean.
Turkey's moves have raised concerns. Russia and France worry that Turkey may send mercenaries from Syria and Libya to fight in Azerbaijan, thereby stoking instability in the country. Stable Arab powers such as Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and the UAE have denounced such moves by Turkey.
An aggressive foreign policy and a complete mismanagement of domestic affairs have sowed economic crisis at home. The Turkish Lira has lost significant value and the trade deficit has widened. According to recent economic data, Turkey's trade deficit jumped to 192.7 per cent year-on-year in September, something which caused Erdogan to cry loud in his irresponsible statements.
In addition to Syria, Iraq, and Libya, Erdogan is mulling over expanding his power to Sudan and dragging it into quagmire. However, Sudan aborted his plans and is currently developing successive solutions to various crises that the country has been suffering from for ages.
Recently a peace deal was inked between Sudan's transitional government and Sudanese Revolutionary Front, and more parties are expected to join the deal soon. The peace deal is an epoch in the history of Sudan which will allow about 4.5 million refugees and displaced Sudanese to return home.
The Sudanese government is also working to improve the country's foreign relations, and explore ways of getting the sanctions on the country lifted. Washington had long required Khartoum to establish peace, respect of human rights and religious freedom, counterterrorism efforts. The recent peace agreement signed by Sudanese government and rebels include all these points. 
Meanwhile, Turkey is still playing with fire and setting up militias in Arab countries to worsen their situation in addition to supporting the formation of governments from parties carrying the terrorist Muslim Brotherhood ideology to be their subordinate and wing in these countries. What a betrayal! -malzarooni@khaleejtimes.com 
 


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