The Morocco dialogue

Talks in Morocco could have opened vistas for regularising trade and communication channels, which at the moment are chaotic as the militant groups run the show for international audience.



Just a day before warring Libyan factions were supposed to huddle together for a conflict resolution dialogue, the initiative has gone. The internationally-recognised parliament in Tobruk backed out of talks in Morocco, blaming the rivals for Friday’s suicide attack, which killed more than 40 people. As they say the devil is in the details, the eleventh-hour decision to suspend participation was taken as Tobruk parliamentarians wanted to preempt demands from the international community to include members from the radicals-dominated General National Congress in Tripoli in any future unity government. They thought, as stated by Issa Al Aribi, a legislator, it would compromise their legitimacy and provide impetus to militants who are inadvertently linked with Daesh and are running a parallel government from Tripoli.

But the point is that this boycott will hardly serve the purpose, as it will further strengthen the impression that Libya is truncated and is devoid of a legitimate dispensation. The powers-that-be in Tobruk should take a holistic view of the prevailing situation and enter into a broad-based understanding with all the stakeholders, irrespective of their present power potential or legality debate. That would help in defusing the alarming status quo and de-escalate the conflict to a greater extent. Which is why the US State Department was irked over the postponement call. What is needed at this time is to take a leap forward and envisage a scenario wherein stability could be restored and the culture of militancy is curbed.

Talks in Morocco could have opened vistas for regularising trade and communication channels, which at the moment are chaotic as the militant groups run the show for international audience. Last but not the least is the issue of Daesh infiltration, which no nationalist political element can tolerate, as it threatens the North African state’s sovereignty and its very existence. Tobruk legislators and its embattled government have an opportunity in disaster to get the country back on track.


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