KT Edit: Sudan deal puts it on the road to democracy

Sudan made history today with the signing of an agreement for a civililan-military government that is hoped would guide it to elections and full democracy in three years. It has taken a lot of compromise and sacrifice. Patience was key as both sides played for time. Hundreds died in the protests this year that followed the ouster of long-time president Omar Al Bashir in April. Bashir may be gone and a trial is being organised in a show of punishment for his alleged crimes over thirty years, including the mass killings in Darfur unleashed by a militia loyal to him. That bloody history is past but must not be forgotten in Sudan's quest for a better future. A movement for real reform and democracy has now permeated into Sudanese society. People want change and a new leadership that listens to their woes. They want consensus - builders who will help the nation shed violence and extremism while putting it on the path to development and reform. The idealism is evident, it's palpable on the streets and is felt in villages and homes of the country. Hundreds gave up their lives for their rights and freedom, for dignity and respect, they suffered yet persevered, never giving up till they had a concrete deal in sight. They are the true heroes on this historic day. And they waited three decades to make their voices heard, for their protests to make an impact. This is time for rejoicing and also for introspection. The hard part begins as the civilian and the entrenched military elite attempt to strike a balance in a transitional government before elections are called. This experiment at governance has never been tried before in any country, but this is a strong start towards reconciling differences politically while eschewing violence and bloodshed. The agreement between civilians, leaders and the army prevented further bloodshed in the country and stopped it from sliding into all-out civil war.
Senior military leader Mohammed Hamdan 'Hemeti' Dagolo says he is committed to the deal as it is in the interests of the country. ''We will stick to every letter of the deal," he said in an interview. Indeed, he must, in letter and spirit. Reneging on the agreement is not an option for Sudan that has come this far with flying colours. For three years, it will be ruled by a Sovereign Council which will comprise six civilians and five military leaders. The Council will appoint a prime minister next week. The immediate challenge for the administration is to fix the economy that was in free fall for decades. Food shortages fuelled the protests against Bashir which eventually led to his exit. The best minds in the country from within and abroad must be deployed to put the economy back on course. The UAE has been a strong supporter of Sudan and will continue to extend financial backing as it heals politically and socially. The country needs wise investments that create jobs for its young population. This should be the priority. Rebuilding will be hard but if the civilian and military arms of the government strike a rapport, Sudan will realise its economic potential on the road to democracy.




More news from OPINION
Unjabbed Djokovic is humbled Down Under

Opinion

Unjabbed Djokovic is humbled Down Under

Real champions put spectators first in the pursuit of glory. Novak, however, has emerged the Djoker of the pack by riding slipshod over the rules. He almost got away with his antics until good sense prevailed and the Australian government and legal system intervened to show him the door.

Opinion1 week ago

India is the market for the next decade

Opinion

India is the market for the next decade

Corporate earnings appear to be on the cusp of revival. The earnings growth is expected to be more than 50 per cent between FY20 and FY22; earnings growth momentum is likely to continue at more than 25 per cent annually over the next couple of years.

Opinion1 week ago

An assault, a trial and a road to nowhere

Opinion

An assault, a trial and a road to nowhere

A day after a leading south Indian actress opened up on social media about her life as victim and survivor of a sexual assault in 2017, a groundswell of support is forming in the film industry of her home state, Kerala.

Opinion1 week ago

Can US elections be made safe from Capitol-type mob violence?

Opinion

Can US elections be made safe from Capitol-type mob violence?

It’s understandable that Biden may be reluctant to prosecute his 2020 election opponent and potential opponent in 2024. Even if neither man runs in 2024, prosecution of a former president by his successor would be a huge distraction from Biden’s efforts to govern, would divide the country even further, and perhaps lead to even worse violence than a year ago.

Opinion1 week ago

Digitisation set to revolutionise healthcare

Opinion

Digitisation set to revolutionise healthcare

The future of healthcare is shaping up in front of us. You will see humanoid robots in many hospitals — many will be unseen, sitting inside computers and providing diagnosis and treatment protocols to help the doctors. Wearables and trackers with remote monitoring has already become quite popular and will increase significantly.

Opinion1 week ago