KT Edit: Is this the beginning of another nightmare in Afghanistan?

Terror and resorting to violence for any cause are unjustifiable. It is barbaric and goes against the grain of a civilised society where people simply want to be left in peace.
Modern Afghanistan has suffered from decades of terror and militancy, where superpowers played their hand and lost. First it was the Soviets who arrived in the late seventies. They provoked an extremist ideology that spread far and wide. The ideology took on the occupiers and terror groups expanded their influence as the Red Army was beaten back. The USSR retreated from the country in the early eighties and the disparate groups who had ousted them mutated into the Taleban and Al Qaeda in the country and threatened local puppet governments that came and went in quick succession. The US and Nato arrived in early 2000 to fight the war against terror. Eighteen years later, they have realised that they cannot win a war in Afghanistan and have to make peace with the Taleban, once a terror outfit that is now making its mark as a political force. But the bloodshed and bombings continue as innocent Afghans are caught in the crossfire. The Taleban may be coming into the political mainstream as the US plans to cut and run from the strife-torn country having nothing to show for after 18 years of occupation.
On Saturday evening, 63 people were killed at a wedding reception in Kabul. Now that the Taleban have tempered down and attempts to become a political entity through the process of dialogue with the US and Pakistan, there are concerns that sectarian strife is looming with help from other, more deadly groups. The Taleban has condemned the blast but fingers are pointing to Daesh's role. From the mujahideen to Taleban to Al Qaeda and to Daesh, the mutation of extremist outfits continues; someone wants to keep the fire burning. War is a process, arms are sold for billions and some powers benefit. Who, is the question. Terror as an extension of state policy is not a new school of thought but is an instrument of war from ancient times. Insurgency, militancy and sectarianism come in handy to keep the system churning. Daesh may have been displaced from Syria and Iraq but are looking for an opportunity to start a new chapter and a new location. They may have found it in Afghanistan where the US is in a hurry to get out. The trouble is the way the terror culture has been fostered and handled all these years. There were good terrorists and bad terrorists if it suited your interests. The big powers were sold on the idea and made a mess of the situation. The latest attack shows that all terrorists cannot be trusted - the Taleban, Al Qaeda or Daesh. Who knows, they may have come together for a larger cause in Afghanistan with the US signalling its intentions to leave the country.
This could be the beginning of another nightmare.




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