Historic transition in Myanmar

As rightly stated by the new president, the challenge for democracy has just begun. The country's new leadership has a daunting task in the form of brokering reconciliation among feuding communities.



It takes a lot of courage to stand down and be sworn in for a junior position by one of your disciples. Aung San Suu Kyi has made that happen as she took her oath of office as minister in charge of foreign affairs. She will additionally hold the portfolios of education, energy and electric power. As Myanmar got its first elected civilian president in 50 years, the credit goes to Suu Kyi who explored the possibility of a grand deal with the military. She was content to appoint her aide as the next president of the republic. Hitn Kyaw's swearing-in as president seals the fate of the army, which had ruled the country for more than six decades. But under a carefully choreographed understanding with the ruling National League for Democracy party, the army will have its nominees for the three key ministries of defence, home and border affairs.
As rightly stated by the new president, the challenge for democracy has just begun. The country's new leadership has a daunting task in the form of brokering reconciliation among feuding communities. A ceasefire is a must in order to negotiate a peace deal with various ethnic groups that have been up in arms for decades. The Rohingya Muslims are in need of a special deal as they are not entitled to be legal citizens. Suu Kyi, who has a critical role to play in decision-making as her proxy runs the country, has to adopt a bipartisan approach while rewriting a new social contract. The Nobel laureate is better advised to focus at home rather than foreign affairs, as the nation has been reeling under a biased governance for decades under the military. This is indispensable if Myanmar has to bury the hatchet.


More news from OPINION
KT Long Read: Watch this space

Opinion

KT Long Read: Watch this space

Major disruptions in the global space industry, including in India that recently liberalised the sector, are heralding an emergence of a whole new world: ramifications will be wide-ranging, high-yielding — and ultimately benefit humanity

Opinion1 week ago