Lack of social justice could lead to fall of governments

Lack of social justice could lead to fall of governments
Becki Anderson, CNN, Moderator, Mary Robinson, Former President of Ireland and President of Mary Robinson Foundation - Climate Justice, Dominique De Villepin, Former Prime Minister of France, Dr. Mahmoud Gebril, Former Prime Minister of Libya, Professor Muhammad Yunus, Founder of Grameen Bank and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate on the second day at the World Government Summit in Dubai on Tuesday 09, February 2016.

Dubai - According to Yunus, human rights, democracy and government institutions will continue to fail if nothing is done to correct the unequal distribution of the world's wealth.



By Angel Tesorero

Published: Tue 9 Feb 2016, 11:00 PM

Last updated: Wed 10 Feb 2016, 12:02 PM

 Nobel Peace Prize awardee Mohammed Yunus cited lack of social justice as a primary reason for some governments failing and continuing to fail.
Bangladeshi social entrepreneur and economist who founded Grameen Bank, a pioneer in microfinance, was joined at the World Government Summit by a panel composed of former heads of state from France, Libya and Ireland to discuss "Why Do Governments Fail?"
The discussion deliberated on the issues faced by governments and the reasons attributed to their failure. The panelists agreed that key issues were linked to public anger over the disproportionate distribution of wealth, lack of public inclusion in policy decisions, and the growing disconnect between governments and citizens' priorities, especially the large section of youth.
According to Yunus, human rights, democracy and government institutions will continue to fail if nothing is done to correct the unequal distribution of the world's wealth where 62 people are wealthier than the bottom half of the entire world population.
"Six years back, there were 388 people owning half of the world's economy, now the number of (world's wealthiest) has decreased and the wealth has concentrated to a less number of people," Yunus pointed out.
"The world's economy is selfish-driven. We need to protect our civilisation, otherwise, if we allow this concentration (of wealth) to continue, tomorrow will be worse," added Yunus. - angel@khaleejtimes.com


More news from Government