Woman threatens to strangle UAE cop after being caught for begging

UAE cop, UAE police, CID, Ras Al Khaimah, crime, ramadan

Ras Al Khaimah - The woman admitted to have 'insulted an unidentified man' whom she did not know was a security personnel.



An Arab woman caught while begging allegedly threatened to strangle a cop as she was being interrogated. "If you were in my country, I would have pinned you down and strangled you to death," the woman fumed at the security man, while insulting and abusing him.
She and her friend, also an Arab woman, are standing trial at the Ras Al Khaimah Criminal Court on charges of begging and resisting police arrest.
As per the sheet of indictment, both fiercely resisted the CID men when they tried to stop them from begging, and refused to get into the police car.
The duo was referred to the court.
During hearing, the woman accused of threatening the cop admitted to have "insulted an unidentified man" whom she did not know was a security personnel.
"I thought he was only an informer who reported us as beggars to the police." She added that she apologised immediately after she realised he was a CID man.
"I said I was sorry, and contended that I was not begging."
The other woman admitted to have been previously arrested for begging.
"This time, I was only sitting next to my friend behind a restaurant after eating our food," she claimed.
She added that she was taken aback when some women held her tightly from behind and asked her to get into a car.
"I did not know they were police investigators. They just asked us to get into their car and go with them to the police station for no apparent reason."
The court ordered adjournment of the case to next week to issue its ruling.
In April 2018, the UAE passed an anti-begging law which punishes anyone caught begging with a Dh5,000 fine and up to three months in prison. Those who operate gangs of beggars invite a prison sentence of not less than six months as well as a minimum fine of Dh100,000.

ahmedshaaban@khaleejtimes.com


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