41 maids rounded up in Dubai

The General Directorate of Residency and Foreigners Affairs in Dubai, intensifying raids against illegal workers and residents, has detained a new batch of 42 illegal residents and workers.



According to a senior officer, the detainees — all women — were nabbed in three days over the period from June 12 to 14 from different areas of Dubai including Abu Hail, Hor Al Anz, Al Quoz, Al Satwa and Al Jafliya.

“The illegals caught included 36 Asian and five African domestic helps,” Lt-Col Khalaf Al Ghaith, Assistant Director-General for Investigation and Illegals Follow-up Sector, said on Tuesday. “All the illegal maids arrested proved to have absconded from their sponsors, and worked part and full time with other employers in violation of residency and labour laws,” he added.

Some 73 Asian and African illegals, mostly domestic helpers, have been nabbed this June so far from different areas of Dubai.

Lt-Col Khalaf Al Ghaith said the directorate, having been alerted by the undercover agents about the illegal workers, raided their hideouts and arrested them.

Under UAE labour laws, employment visa holders are not allowed to work part time for any event unless permitted by the sponsor. Visit visa holders are not allowed to work at all.

“The public are urged to immediately report any illegal residents or absconders they know or come across to the section at toll free number: 8005111,” he urged.

Late last month, the directorate announced that it had detained 5,552 illegal residents and workers in the first five months of the year.

Those included a gang of four Asian men implicated in illegally assisting and sheltering 18 part and full time maids, including two Africans and 16 Asians.

“The 5,552 illegals detained in the first five months of this year include 4,337 men and 1,215 women, spanning 1,133 workers, 832 domestic helpers, 2,241 illegal residents, and 1,346 on expired visas,” said Major General Mohammed Ahmed Al Marri, Director-General of the directorate.

ahmedshaaban@khaleejtimes.com


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