UAE: Daily Covid-19 cases dip below 1,000 for first time this year

Due to the decline in new infections, the federal, Dubai and Sharjah governments have announced the easing of restrictions



by

Waheed Abbas

Published: Tue 15 Feb 2022, 5:13 PM

Last updated: Wed 16 Feb 2022, 1:03 PM

New coronavirus cases in the UAE fell below 1,000 for the first time this year.

The Ministry of Health and Prevention reported the lowest tally of infections this year, as it announced 930 cases on Tuesday, February 15.

The Omicron-driven Covid-19 cases have consistently declined in the country since January 15, 2022. Daily cases had been above the 1,000-mark since December 22.

Due to the decline in new Covid-19 cases, the federal, Dubai and Sharjah governments have announced the easing of restrictions related to the pandemic.

The decline in new coronavirus cases is a credit to the aggressive vaccination drive embarked on by the government as well as UAE residents' adherence to safety and precautionary measures against the pandemic.

As of Tuesday, over 95 per cent of eligible residents are fully vaccinated against Covid-19, while 100 per cent have received at least one dose.

The UAE doctors told Khaleej Times earlier that the Omicron wave has reached its peak and is receding now.

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"The good thing is that people in the UAE are going for vaccinating themselves to protect and immunise against the pandemic. Once a person has received the jab, the immune system will be stronger even if they're infected earlier.

"Also, if people test positive but they have received the jab, it will not result in active serious disease, and the severity will be less," Dr Adel Al Sisi, chief medical officer, consultant and head of ICU at Prime Hospital, had said.

Capital Economics said in a study in January that the UAE leads in a successful Covid-19 booster drive, and based on experiences of the other countries, it's believed that the Omicron virus will quickly fade away in the UAE.

-waheedabbas@khaleejtimes.com


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