Narratiive Tags - Khaleej Times Desktop
Coronavirus Pandemic
Logo
 

Coronavirus: Study reveals 'safest seat on plane' to avoid infection

Web Report
Filed on January 30, 2020
Coronavirus, UAE coronavirus , coronavirus  in UAE, 2019-nCo, Wuhan coronavirus, India, Bihar, health, China, warning, travel, China virus, mers, sars, Wuhan, Coronavirus outbreak, tourists, Visa

Researchers demonstrated how viruses can spread.

As coronavirus scare intensifies, travellers across the world remain terrified of flying, considering airports can be a vulnerable spot to contract the infection.

Researchers studied how the movement and seating of an infected person in a plane affected other passengers. And came up with the conclusion that the window seat is the safest place to sit on a plane to avoid catching coronavirus.

Experts from Emory University derived the conclusion after studying passengers' behaviour on flights lasting between three and five hours. They found that 38 per cent of passengers left their seats once while 24 per cent more than once, but passengers by the window barely left their seat at all. This reduced the number of contacts with other passengers from 64 for those sitting in the aisle to just 12 for window seat holders, reported Daily Mail.

Coronavirus: Study reveals 'safest seat on plane' to avoid infection (KT23095130.PNG)

Researchers also demonstrated the movement of passengers around an aircraft to show how viruses can spread. They found that passengers in aisle seats are much more likely to come into contact with infected passengers as well as cabin crew.  

They backed the conclusion by pointing out that people don't just sit down during flights, they visit the bathroom, stretch their legs and touch overhead lockers.

Coronavirus: Study reveals 'safest seat on plane' to avoid infection (KT23096130.PNG)

"Suppose you're seated in an aisle seat or a middle seat and I walk by to go to the lavatory. We're going to be in close contact, meaning we'll be within a meter. So if I'm infected, I could transmit to you...Ours was the first study to quantify this," Howard Weiss, study author told National Geographic.

 

 

As coronavirus scare intensifies, travellers across the world remain terrified of flying, considering airports can be a vulnerable spot to contract the infection. 

Researchers studied how the movement and seating of an infected person in a plane affected other passengers. And came up with the conclusion that the window seat is the safest place to sit on a plane to avoid catching coronavirus. 

Experts from Emory University derived the conclusion after studying passengers' behaviour on flights lasting between three and five hours. They found that 38 per cent of passengers left their seats once while 24 per cent more than once, but passengers by the window barely left their seat at all. This reduced the number of contacts with other passengers from 64 for those sitting in the aisle to just 12 for window seat holders, reported Daily Mail. 

Researchers also demonstrated the movement of passengers around an aircraft to show how viruses can spread. They found that passengers in aisle seats are much more likely to come into contact with infected passengers as well as cabin crew.  

They backed the conclusion by pointing out that people don't just sit down during flights, they visit the bathroom, stretch their legs and touch overhead lockers. "Suppose you're seated in an aisle seat or a middle seat and I walk by to go to the lavatory. We're going to be in close contact, meaning we'll be within a meter. So if I'm infected, I could transmit to you...Ours was the first study to quantify this," Howard Weiss, study author told National Geographic.


ERROR: Macro /ads/dfp-ad-article-new is missing!
MORE FROM Coronavirus Pandemic
MORE FROM Khaleej Times
CurrentRequestUnmodified: /apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20200401/ARTICLE/200409994&Show=0 macro_action: article, macro_profile: , macro_adspot:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
KT App Download
khaleejtimes app

All new KT app
is available
for download:

khaleejtimes - android khaleejtimes - ios