For stand up comedian Russell Peters making people laugh is a calling

For stand up comedian Russell Peters making people laugh is a calling

Born in Toronto to Eric and Maureen Peters, the funnyman is of Anglo-Indian descent.



By (IANS)

Published: Sat 14 Feb 2015, 11:08 PM

Last updated: Thu 25 Jun 2015, 11:09 PM

Comedy is about telling the truth in a funny way, says world-famous stand-up comedian Russell Peters, ahead of his multi-city tour in India.

Born in Toronto to Eric and Maureen Peters, the funnyman is of Anglo-Indian descent.

Peters often features personal incidents and stories in his comic acts, and says: “I don’t think there’s anything that I do that would ‘hurt’ someone’s feelings”.

“Comedy is about telling the truth and people can tell if you’re just trying to be mean. They can sense your intent. My intent is just to be funny.

“Everything I talk about is real and based on things that have happened to me or my friends. The audience always knows when you’re lying, so never lie to them,” added the 44-year-old entertainer.

When he started performing stage shows back in 1989, Peters was just 18 years old and says he started doing stand-up comedy because he had always wanted to it. And he does it well - considering the record-setting attendance he draws for his shows.

But he says he didn’t choose to be a comedian “to set records”.

“I started doing stand-up because I had to. It was a calling. If you’re doing stand-up for fame or to get rich, you’re doing it for the wrong reasons. I’ve been doing this for 26 years now,” he said.

He’s upbeat about enthralling the “energetic” Indian audience.

“There’s no other place in the world that has the energy that India has. I live in Malibu but would be very happy living in Bombay (Mumbai),” Peters said.

When he’s not travelling and performing, the humorist loves to spend time with Crystianna, his four-year-old daughter with former wife Monica Diaz, thanks to whom he has seen Oscar-winning animation film Frozen about “two thousand times”.

Otherwise, he has no time for films - whether Hollywood or Bollywood.

“I never grew up watching Bollywood movies; it just wasn’t a thing in our house,” he said.


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