Verdict on appeal of 17 Indians on Sept 12

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Verdict on appeal of 17 Indians on Sept 12

The Sharjah Court of Appeals has fixed a session on September 12 to pronounce its verdict in the appeal of 17 Indians against the death penalty awarded to them

by

Amira Agarib

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Published: Wed 27 Jul 2011, 11:58 PM

Last updated: Thu 2 Apr 2015, 6:17 AM

The Sharjah Court of Appeals has fixed a session on September 12 to pronounce its verdict in the appeal of 17 Indians against the death penalty awarded to them by a lower court for the murder of a Pakistani man in an armed attack on a rival bootlegging gang.

Judge Abdulla Al Shamsi announced this at Wednesday’s hearing after defence lawyers deposited the blood money and compensation of Dh3.4 million and a representative of the victim’s family, Mohammed Ramadan, signed a letter pardoning the defendants.

During the court hearing, the judge asked if a settlement was reached and defence lawyer Mohammed Salman submitted Dh3.4 million, which was handed over to him by Dubai-based Indian hotelier and chairman of the Apex group of companies S. P. Singh Oberoi, in blood money and compensation to the court.

The judge asked Ramadan if the victim’s family would accept the blood money and give pardon to the defendants. After taking a few minutes to make sure that the money handed over in dirhams to the court personnel was equivalent to 80 million Pakistani rupees, he said yes.

The court ordered the defence lawyer to deposit the blood money at the Sharjah Courts which will be handed over to Ramadan after he produces his passport.

The judge asked the 17 Indians how long they had been jailed, and the defendants said that they had served two years and three months in jail, though they had spent almost two years and seven months.

Ramadan signed the official legal pardon letter.

Khaled Mohamoud Khaled who held negotiations with the victim’s family told Khaleej Times that he reached an agreement with the family members ten days ago.

Meanwhile, another Pakistani national, Mushtaq Ahmed who was injured in the armed attack by a rival gang on June 17, 2009, said that he had lodged a civil case demanding a compensation of Dh400,000.

Mushtaq, who failed to identify the attackers because it was dark but claimed that he was stabbed in different parts of the body and suffered a head injury and an arm fracture, said the negotiator had promised to compensate him, but he had not been given any amount. Hence, he lodged a civil complaint against the defendants.

The Indian Consulate, reacting to the developments, said in a statement: “Today’s developments in the Sharjah Appeals Court were the most significant since April 2010 when the appeal process was initiated by the Government of India-appointed lawyers. The process of a mutually agreeable understanding led by the Indian community, particularly S. P. Singh Oberoi, reached a closure today.

“The Government of India, keeping in mind the interests of the accused and recognising and respecting the local judicial processes and practices, had no objection to the compromise established by the Indian community today in the Sharjah Appeals Court.”

The 17 Indians were sentenced to death by the Sharjah Court of First Instance on March 29.

news@khaleejtimes.com



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