Traditional hospitality at UAE's Global Village pavilion

Traditional hospitality at UAEs Global Village pavilion

Emirati stalls at Global Village offer visitors the true taste of UAE hospitality.



By Web Report

Published: Thu 20 Nov 2014, 6:08 PM

Last updated: Tue 7 Apr 2015, 8:47 PM

UAE pavilion at Global Village
The UAE pavilion at Global Village. Supplied photo.

Dubai: The traditional look and feel of the UAE pavilion is a fantastic experience for visitors. The pavilion gives off the impression of being a traditional souk. The design of the sandy coloured facade supports this, and as visitors enter the pavilion the fragrance of the burning bakhoor and oud immediately awaken the senses.

The Al Dhanai store is a regular fixture of the UAE pavilion with Ali Al Dhanai, the owner, bringing his products back to Global Village for the 9th time. While the store is popular for its local honey, bees wax, and honeycomb, the real pull for many visitors is the experience of traditional and renowned Emirati hospitality that they receive at the stall.

The honey is all locally produced in Dibba Fujairah, giving the honey a distinct flavor as it is mainly produced from the flowers on two trees -- sidr and samar. The two trees are said to make very distinctly flavoured honey that is popular amongst tourists and locals.

Every year guests are welcomed and offered traditional Arabic coffee and lulu dates, to reflect the hospitality and generosity of the UAE people. Mohammed Rashid Al Hafiti who works in the store, even offers guests a seat in the store, as Emiratis would to a weary traveler. Some of the tastiest dates that are on offer in Global Village can be found at this stall, with a special mixture of coconut shavings sprinkled on the date.

Mohammed also sells other items, especially locally produced products that have traditional value, namely the Shemagh -- a traditional Emirati head dress -- and the traditional kandura for men. The culturally significant and ever popular yollah, the plastic prop that is regularly used in the traditional Yollah dance, is also on sale, as well as the walking sticks that are used in Emirati dances.

Visitors can expect a true taste of Emirati culture at the UAE pavilion and this will allow tourists, local residents, and Emiratis to see that the hospitable nature of the UAE is still widely sought and highly regarded.


More news from