The team that made it possible

His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai; His Highness Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, & other officials
His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai; His Highness Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, & other officials

As the Hope Probe launches into the space today, let's revisit the team at site



By Rhonita Patnaik

Published: Mon 20 Jul 2020, 11:42 AM

Last updated: Mon 20 Jul 2020, 1:59 PM

The Emirati team at the launch station in Japan worked round the clock to complete the preparations according to a strictly defined schedule and a set of related test tasks over 50 working days, which the team members multitask and accomplish to adhere to the launch date, overcoming all logistical and technical obstacles, including a scare due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

The UAE team is currently stationed at the Tanegashima Space Centre in Japan. Speaking about the mission, Eng. Suhail Al Muheiri said: "We are an integrated team of engineers within the inspection, integration and systems engineering team. As the deputy project manager, it is my responsibility to ensure that the launch vehicle was ready and all communications systems with the ground control are in place. The Hope Probe is a testimony to the capabilities of the UAE and the Arab world to accomplish mega projects and important scientific missions."

Multitasking Mohamed Al Ameri, Senior Space Mechanical Systems Engineer in the Space Mission Department at the UAE Space Agency, said that the eight-member Emirati team in Japan bring together multiple engineering disciplines and a multitude of skills. "We met every morning and share tasks according to a schedule. Each of us work on a set of tasks according to the diversity of responsibilities approach that we have trained on and which qualified us to deal with a wide range of tasks in different disciplines."

Eng. Mohamed Al Ameri's main responsibilities range from design of spacecraft components structure to withstand the space environment with a focus on strength, stiffness, thermal stability, and manufacturability requirements. He is also the Spacecraft lead for the Arab Cooperation Satellite 813 (Hyperspectral Satellite). Al Ameri has a bachelor's degree from the University of Utah in the US, in Mechanical Engineering.

Testing Engineer Omar Al-Shehhi from MBRSC said: "From the onset of the project, we began working on the designs of electrical and mechanical ground equipment, starting with planning tests on the satellite, and the environments that the Hope Probe faces at different stages, such as the vibrations resulting from the launch environment, high and low thermal environment in space, and the assembly and installation of the probe in coordination with different teams."

Issa Hareb Al Muheiri, Energy Systems Engineer, said: "My responsibilities include installing the solar panels that collect renewable and solar energy and powers the batteries. We test those panels and batteries and make sure they comply to the design and multiple tasks of the mission till it reaches Mars' orbit."

Ahmad Obaid Al Yammahi, Assembly and Mechanical Systems Engineer, said: "I provided support to the team during the shipping operation of the satellite. I have utilised my installation and mechanical assembly experience that I gained from my previous work on the KhalifaSat project to support my colleagues in the Hope Probe team and ensure best preparations."

At the helm of design is Mahmoud Al Awadi, Mechanical Systems Engineer. He said: "I worked with the team to design a probe structure that meets all the requirements and visions of all departments scientifically and practically. We then started installation and assembly and moved to tests to ensure the safety of the probe and its scientific equipment. I also work as a propulsion system engineer to provide the probe with fuel in Japan."

Youssef Al-Shehhi, Thermal Systems Engineer, said: "The project's thermal systems are a challenge because the Probe will go through very hot temperatures at the launch to very cold temperatures when it reaches Mars. So, we designed the thermal systems and tested them under extremely low and high temperatures."

Responsible for weight, mass and movement, Mohammad Omran Al Ameri, Ground Support Engineer, said: "I joined the Probe Hope project in 2016 with a task to make sure that the probe's systems are correctly integrated and assembled. I also helped design and make ground support equipment, such as the equipment that help integrate scientific devices on the probe to control its movement and direction accurately."

Khalifa Al Muheiri, Satellite Telecommunications Engineer and Communication Subsystem Lead, said: "I worked since 2016 within the Probe communications design group to ensure the integrity of communication throughout its journey from Earth to Mars. This is important for receiving all information from the Probe and sending orders to it from the earth station."

Heyam Alblooshi, Manufacturing, Assembly, Integration and Test, MAIT, and Quality Assurance Engineer, said: "The Hope Probe is more than its scientific goals; it's a testament to the UAE's readiness to tackle challenges and proves to be the ideal incubator for youth by inspiring them to follow their dreams. The Hope Probe project was developed by a group of diligent and enthusiastic Emiratis who achieved it in record time, and our wise government has provided opportunities to excel in all fields. It represents an Emirati contribution to benefit all humanity."

HISTORY IN THE MAKING: The young Emirati team of the Hope Probe in Japan
HISTORY IN THE MAKING: The young Emirati team of the Hope Probe in Japan

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