'Memories of Ramadan in UAE will stay with us'

Memories of Ramadan in UAE will stay with us
Husain's family ends their fast with soup and wheat bread (roti) .

Dubai - The family of 52-year-old Hamid Husain, based in Deira, is a close-knit family that starts their Iftar preparation about an hour before the Maghreb prayer.



Published: Mon 5 Jun 2017, 7:33 PM

Last updated: Mon 5 Jun 2017, 9:39 PM

Each and every Muslim family here in Dubai has its own way of spending their time in the holy month of Ramadan and a different tradition in preparing and ending their fast.
The family of 52-year-old Hamid Husain, based in Deira, is a close-knit family that starts their Iftar preparation about an hour before the Maghreb prayer.
"The holy month of Ramadan is a precious time for worship, prayer and getting closer to Almighty Allah," the Indian sales manager, originally from Ujjain MP, told Khaleej Times.
"It is a time to give, forgive, and get spiritually uplifted, and all my family members are deeply believe in giving charity and helping others, more so during the holy month," he said.
"We do not have time to waste in watching TV, for example, and even my kids forget all about playing games and focus on reciting the Holy Quran and supplicating."
A loving husband, doting father and obedient son Husain helps out his wife Shireen, while laying the table. Emulating their dad, Husain's two sons also help out their mother at times.
"My 21-year-old son, Hatim, and 14-year-old son, Hasan, are also a great help to the family before and after the preparation of the Iftar and Suhoor meals."
Hatim, the elder son, studies computer sciences at the Acropolis College in Indore while Hasan, the younger son, is in a grade 10 student, and he goes to Gulf Indian High School, he added.
"Of my 24-year career in Dubai, I feel that the holy month of Ramadan is really scheduled and comfortable here due to the ease and comfort ensured by the government." 
Elaborating, he said there are all types of facilities given by the government. "Private companies and individuals are giving more for charity, and it is really amazing to see this big number of free Iftar meals contributed to indigent people and even regular people everywhere."
Husain indicated that every community gets together more in Ramadan to worship Allah and perform prayers. "We have our Iftar together with people from different communities, and that adds to our happiness in this month of tolerance and compassion." 
Husain's family ends their fast with soup and wheat bread (roti) . 
"These are apart from salad, samosa, kababs, mutton and chicken items, and a wide variety of fruits." When it is half an hour before Iftar, Husain's family not only gears up for Iftar but sit down together to recite the Holy Quran.
"What I like most about Ramadan here in Dubai is hearing azan (call to prayer) five times a day, the diversity of the city where people from the world meet and peacefully coexist."
Although the true essence of Ramadan is all about the pursuit of spiritual elevation, Muslims celebrate it in a variety of ways. Thus, special memories about Ramadan are engraved in their hearts here and back home.
Of the best memories Husain recalls about the holy month of Ramadan back home, was when his mother used to prepare him hareesa (food made from milk and nut) 30 years ago back in India." 
"I do miss those times spent with my father Abbas (88) and mother Fatima (78), who live in India."
Husain feels very fortunate for being here in the UAE with his family and expressing his sincere appreciation for the prudent leadership of the UAE said: "They spare no effort to secure everything for not only their people but also for us expatriates too," he said.
"I wish that even my home country develops just like the UAE, and pray that every country is as stable as the UAE. It is really inspiring to see this big number of people from different backgrounds and religions living peacefully in one place."
ahmedshaaban@khalejtimes.com
 
 


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