Learning Arabic makes Quran memorization easier

Learning Arabic makes Quran memorization easier

Big prizes await toppers: the first winner is awarded Dh250,000 which the second is given 200,000, and the third 150,000.



By Staff Report

Published: Mon 29 Jun 2015, 6:55 PM

Last updated: Wed 8 Jul 2015, 3:16 PM

 17-year-old Mousa Mohammed Madfaa of Palestine. Supplied photo

 17-year-old Mousa Mohammed Madfaa of Palestine. Supplied photo

Dubai – Whereas so many young people have learnt the holy Quran in full without being able to pronounce or understand a single word in Arabic, learning this language makes Quran memorization much easier. 

This was affirmed by 21-year-old Mohammed Ibrahim who represents Afghanistan in the 19th edition of the Dubai International holy Quran Award this year. “It was difficult for me to memorise the Quran when I started this holy journey at the age of eight, but things became easier when I learnt Arabic language.” 

It took Ibrahim four years to thoroughly memorise the holy Quran in a school for Quran in his home city Kabul. “My elder brother, who also memorises the Quran in full, was so helpful to me. He used to teach and encourage me to have this eternal honour and source of happiness in life and the Hereafter.” 

Showing exceptional performance in several local Quran contests, Ibrahim has been qualified for participation in the Dubai International Holy Quran Award which he described as “super and well-organised”. 

“I wish to be an Arabic and Quran teacher in the future as the best of Muslims is the one who learns the Quran and teaches it to others as advised by Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him).” 

Memorising the Quran was a piece of cake to 17-year-old Mousa Mohammed Madfaa of Palestine, however. “I used to memorise one page every two days, but kept revising all the time so as not to forget.” 

Learning the Quran was so helpful in Ibrahim’s academic studies. “I have just obtained my secondary certificate with honours in Nablus city of the Western Bank, Palestine, and I am planning to continue my university studies and hit the books of Islamic banking.” 

Though it is the second international challenge for Ibrahim, he is so happy and proud to be part of the Dubai International Holy Quran Award. “Participating in this prestigious award has always been my best dream all day and night,” he said, wishing to rank first.

Elder brother was meanwhile so helpful to the 19-year-old Gambian contestant Sirajo Jallow as was the case with the Afghani contestant. “I started memorising the Quran in 2003 and finished in 2007at a school for Quran in Gambia.” 

Committed to memorisation, Jallow spends most of his time with the holy Quran which is his “best friend; it is always with me all the time wherever I go to read, memorise and revise on a regular basis.” 

The grade-12 student has been nominated for the Dubai International Holy Quran Award by a special committee. “The African Muslims Panel, which has a special section for nominating competent Quran memorisers for international competitions, has given me this precious chance to be here in Dubai.”  

Though it is Jallow’s first international contest, his elder brother has brilliantly competed in the Dubai Award and secured an advanced position. “His participation was so inspiring to me that I insisted on learning the Quran and having full command of its recitation.” 

The 11-category award, aimed to serve the Holy Quran and promote Quranic performance, is annually held under the patronage of His Highness Shaikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai. 

“Big prizes await toppers: the first winner is awarded Dh250,000 which the second is given 200,000, and the third 150,000. Winners from the fourth to the tenth are gifted Dh65,000 – Dh5,000 less each. The rest of participants are prized a bonus of Dh30,000 each,” he said.

ahmedshaaban@khaleejtimes.com


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