Kids protest obscene videos

SHARJAH — The Youth Consultative Council on Monday discussed the impact of "seductive and obscene" video clips aired by some television channels, on the minds of children, and the way it affects their religious beliefs.

By A Staff Reporter

  • Follow us on
  • google-news
  • whatsapp
  • telegram

Published: Wed 13 Apr 2005, 10:30 AM

Last updated: Thu 2 Apr 2015, 7:02 PM

The gathering, comprising 14 of the 28 girls aged between 12 and 18 years who are members of the Youth Consultative Council, felt that some TV channels were getting away with such telecasts only because there was no firm legislation in the Arab countries against such programmes.

According to a recent survey conducted by an Arabic magazine Awladona (Our Children), 98 per cent of children aged between 3 and 18 years were hooked to watching video clips of songs. The sample for the survey included 57 parents and 65 children from the UAE, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia.

According to the survey, 39 per cent of the children went for the lyrics, 31 per cent viewed the clips to admire the beauty of the singers and observe their clothes, 26 per cent like the way songs are directed while 25 per cent watch the thrilling or tempting scenes in the songs.

The results of the survey were discussed in the gathering which was attended by Khawla Abdul Rahman Al Mulla, Member of Sharjah Consultative Council and Headmaster of Roqaya School and Magdi Al Shafi from the Ministry of Auqaf and Islamic Affairs.

Fatima Humaid, a member of YCC, said that various media including magazines, television advertisements and video clips were passively contributing towards corrupting young minds with wrong morals and ethics which ultimately led to depraved personality.

"Seductive video clips are being screened night and day, and children usually enjoy watching the singers whom they begin to idolise. They begin imitating their idols, wearing clothes similar to what these singers wear and even behave like them, and in the process, ignore traditions and morals.

“I call for the establishment of an authority which will ban screening of such video clips while encouraging clean video clips with no obscene scenes," she said.

Humaid highlighted the so-called reality shows in which men and women mingle freely under one roof and encourage TV viewers to contact them and chose the best among them.

"I don't understand the main reason behind producing and viewing such programmes which bring no benefit to the young viewers, who are unfortunately attracted to such popular programmes. Saudi Arabia has banned broadcast, financing or participating in such programmes, and I think similar action should be initiated in other countries as well to protect young generations," she said.

Ahlam Abdul Rahman, another member, discussed the misuse of Internet by teenagers who log into forbidden web sites rather than acquiring beneficial knowledge and information from the net.

Urging the students to advise their friends against watching such video clips, Al Mulla said the singers are encouraged to do what they are doing only because of the huge audience. But, if everyone is united in raising voice against such shows, they will be forced to be decent in their videos, he said.

AN EYE-OPENER

ACCORDING to the survey undertaken, 98 per cent of children aged between 3 and 18 years were hooked to watching video clips of songs. The sample for the survey included 57 parents and 65 children from the UAE, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia.

The survey reveals:

39 per cent of the children went for the lyrics

31 per cent viewed the clips to admire the beauty of the singers and observe their clothes

26 per cent like the way songs are directed and

25 per cent watch the thrilling or tempting scenes in the songs.



More news from