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How to memorise the Quran in two years

How to memorise the Quran in two years

27 contestants sat for the final examinations of the Dubai International Holy Quran Award.



By Ahmed Shaaban/senior Reporter

Published: Mon 29 Jun 2015, 12:45 AM

Last updated: Wed 8 Jul 2015, 3:16 PM

Dubai - With an unshakable will and family support, it takes just two years or less to memorise the 114 chapters consisting of 6,236 verses of the Holy Quran running into 604 pages.

This was the answer of young Iraqi, Abdul Rahman Majeed, who appeared for the final examinations of the 19th session of the Dubai International Holy Quran Award (DIHQA) on Friday night.

“All praise to Almighty Allah who guided and inspired me to memorise the Holy Quran in 2008 — a holy journey which I finished in 2010 in the Samarra city ... in north Baghdad, where I live.”

The student of Sharia at the Grand Imam College told Khaleej Times his sacred mission started at the mosque where he learnt the Holy Quran by heart under a renowned teacher in his village. “The summer holiday and weekends were not for fun because I used to spend most of my time memorising the Holy Quran.”

With that kind of commitment, Majeed performed exceptionally in all the local Quran contests he participated in. He was nominated for the Dubai International Holy Quran Award by the Sunni Waqf in Iraq.

“I am honoured to have this precious chance and compete in this grand international award which attracts Quran memorisers from across the globe. This is my first participation abroad.”

Qatari contestant Abdoulazez Ghani said he started memorising the Holy Quran at the age of 15 and finished when he was 17. “It took me only two years to learn the Holy Quran by heart.”

The student of Fiqh at the Umm Al Qura University, Makkah, was nominated for the Dubai International Holy Quran Award by the Ministry of Awqaf and Islamic Affairs in Qatar. “This is not my first international contest as I competed before in the Tunisia International Holy Quran Award.”

Tunisian contestant Anouar Ben Slama, memorised the Holy Quran in one and a half years. “My father is key in my holy journey. He used to encourage me to learn the Holy Quran on a regular basis when I was young.”

Ben Slama started memorising the Holy Quran at the age of 15, and finished when he crossed 16. It was not an easy job in the beginning, he said.

“As is the case with everything one wants to learn, it was hard for me to memorise the Holy Quran, but with God’s help, family support and self-determination, I did it.

“I got an advanced position in the Tunisia International Holy Quran Award, but it is really an honour for me to be here and wish to come first and win the Dh250,000 grand prize.”

27 contestants sit for final exams

Meanwhile, 27 contestants have so far sat for the final examinations of the international Quran competition — the main activity of the DIHQA, which started at the Dubai Chamber of Commerce and Industry on Wednesday.

Major-General Mohammed Ahmed Al Marri, Director-General of the General Directorate of Residency and Foreigners Affairs - Dubai, said it is part of the directorate’s social responsibility to co-sponsor the activities of the competition, “which is gaining popularity across the globe”.

“Naming Shaikha Fatima bint Mubarak (Chairwoman of the General Women’s Union (GWU), Supreme Chairwoman of the Family Development Foundation (FDF) and President of the Supreme Council for Motherhood and Childhood) the first female Islamic Personality of the year is a well-deserved honour. Her kind gestures speak volumes locally and abroad.”

Ahmed Mahboob Musabih, Director of Dubai Customs, said the “spiritually uplifting” contest is eagerly followed. “Technology is a critical component in organising this 11-category award.” ahmedshaaban@khaleejtimes.com


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