Firms must train their workers in fire-fighting

ABU DHABI - Companies must train their workers and prepare them for fire-fighting at construction sites. Failure to do so would result in penalties, said an informed source at the Ministry of Labour (MoL).



By Ahmed Abdul Aziz (Our staff reporter)

Published: Sun 22 Jun 2008, 2:27 AM

Last updated: Sun 5 Apr 2015, 6:34 PM

The source, who declined to be named, told Khaleej Times that the labour law obligates the contracting and construction companies to train their workers or bring qualified workers to deal with dangerous situations, particularly fire-fighting.

The ministry warned companies against allowing workers to work at sites without fire-fighting skills.

The move comes in the wake of fire incidents across the country during the last few months.

"The ministry allows the companies' foremen, supervisors, safety officers and some of the workers to attend the three-day training which includes knowledge of latest ways and means of combating fires at work sites," said the source.

The Department of Orientation in the MoL provides lectures to the security and safety-related staff at the contracting companies.

The source affirmed that the ministry conducts investigations in case of huge fires to find out whether the cause was workers' ignorance or is a result of inadequate fire-fighting facilities.

Ministerial order No.32 of the year 1981 stipulates that all companies should provide safety kits to all the workers. The companies are also obligated to send their workers to attend lectures on the latest fire-fighting systems.

Non-adherence to the ministry's instructions and decisions would result in penalties, including suspension of licence for three to six months and a fine of Dh10,000.


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