Abu Dhabi Police participates in scientific conference in US

The two papers examined the interpretation of multiple blood stains on biological evidence collected from crime scenes as a method for solving crimes.

By (Wam)

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Published: Tue 24 Mar 2015, 2:01 PM

Last updated: Thu 25 Jun 2015, 10:35 PM

Orlando -- The Forensic Evidence Department at the Abu Dhabi Police has presented two papers on criminal biology and the genetic sequence at the conference of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in Orlando, Forida, USA.

The two papers examined the interpretation of multiple blood stains on biological evidence collected from crime scenes as a method for solving crimes.

Colonel Abdul Rahman Al Hammadi, Head of the Forensic Evidence Department, said that the conference is concerned with forensics and related criminal sciences. It includes presentations and discussions regarding topics of forensics, forensic anthropology, forensic biology, drugs and toxins, the science of crime detection, cyber evidence, firearms, criminal psychology and criminal justice.

He pointed out that the conference is an opportunity to exchange ideas, discuss cooperation methods, train staff, and to transfer knowledge to the department.

Captain Khadouma Saeed Al Nuaimi presented a paper regarding the theoretical assessment in the distinction of blood stains from the biological evidence collected from crime scenes, which include categorising the evidence based on blood splatter, re-examining the evidence based on technical standards, and maintaining original samples in order to obtain the suspect’s blood details in the possibility that it could be included in the stains.

Captain Al Nuaimi pointed out that this methodology is both time and cost effective and can be used in the most complex and difficult cases involving multiple individuals injured in crimes such as murders or fights.

First Lieutenant Amer Abdulla Al Shehhi, from the genetic sequencing branch of the Forensic Biology Department, presented a paper regarding the requirements of his Masters’ Degree studies from American universities about examining the genetic sequencing on samples resembling the ones collected from crime scenes.

The examination is carried out using “RapidHit”, the Rapid DNA human identification system, which can yield results within 90 minutes. The device has proved efficient in the provision of results for 87 samples, which were subjected to extreme environments, such as temperature and humidity.



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