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Ear to a cure

Pma Rasheed (Contributor)
Filed on November 20, 2007

Renowned South Indian musician Kaithapram Damodaran Namboodiri brings the healing power of music to Dubai

MUSIC HAS now emerged as a therapy, which is making a silent revolution in the medical field. According to researchers, listening to inspiring music helps people attain true happiness, peace of mind and good health in life.

In a world, where worries, fears and desires drive away people's peace of mind, music plays the role of medicine to the soul.

Renowned South Indian musician, lyricist and film personality Kaithapram Damodaran Namboodiri, after carrying out years of research, now wants to propagate music therapy in the world. He was in Dubai recently to promote his latest venture among the expatriates here:

"My visit is to spread the word that music can be helpful in curing any disease. I would like to prove that Ragas and Rogas (diseases) are all same everywhere. Music has also been called as the anti-biotic of tomorrow. Many of you may have already experienced its anti-depressant values. My primary aim is to increase the awareness on music therapy," he explained.

What is concept of music therapy?

Music can be used as a supporting medicine in the treatment of any disease. Imagine the state of relaxation brought about by listening to music. Inner peace creates outer peace — that is called the wellness of body. Music therapy cleanses the patient’s mind with the soap of concentration, and washes it with the water of meditation.

Music is part of human nature. Human bodies have all the expressions of a musical instrument. As per some principles of modern physics, human bodies respond to all music instruments with a Shruthi (tune). Like synchronising the Shruthis of two Veenas (lute), when our mind gets synchronised with our body, through music, we are able to accomplish perfect tranquillity, which according to doctors, is the most significant physical state required for curing various diseases.

The Gathraveena' concept compares our body to the veena; the frets on the veena being the bones encircling our spinal chord and the music that emanates from the vibration of strings being the sound of life radiating from the periodic vibration of our heart. When a well-tuned instrument is played, it will produce positive vibrations in the Gathraveena.

Music therapy can be practiced as an important tool in the treatment of both psychological and psychosomatic disorders. The innovative use of Raagas will become a solace to different kinds of patients, helping them to overcome fear and anxiety.

According to your experience, what types of illnesses can be cured through music therapy?

It has been proven through experiments that music can help improve the blood count of even cancer patients. Recently in Calicut, where I come from, we have also proven that in situations like giving birth to a baby which involves a high degree of pain, we can avoid sedation with the help of music.

For hyper active and violent children, music has proven to be a solution. Music has also shown results in Diabetics patients, especially among the elderly patients, when they suffer from lower levels of oxygen in their blood. Music therapy is a proven cure for high blood pressure. Music can also prevent psychosomatic diseases or diseases originated in the mind.

Music therapy will enhance the concentration level of children and it will also improve adult’s capacity of planning.

How does music work as a healing agent in our body?

Human brain processes music. Through music therapy, this capacity of the brain is improved. The Raagas and rhythms influence the lower and higher cerebral centres of the brain and stimulate its beta cell activities. Music therapy acts on the mind before being transformed into thought and feeling, as it brings about a sense of mental well being, stimulating good vibrations in the nerves of listeners. The healing helps to clear the bad thoughts in mind, which leads one to a positive frame of mind.

By increasing the presence of oxygen in the blood by 100%, music can take a patient into an encouraging mood. Thus, his or her BP becomes normal, stress vanishes and mind becomes hopeful. The same treatment is applicable to a variety of diseases.

Could you explain the method of treatment in music therapy?

To begin with, we offer a 21-day course. The ailments could range from depression, insomnia, mania, neurosis, pain, restlessness and stress to blood pressure, cancer and headache. The patient will be exposed to different Ragas through Kritis, Kirtanas and Bhajans sung by children, because they have melodious voices. The patients would have to stick to a vegetarian diet and do yoga during the course. Cigarette and alcohol are strictly prohibited. And a team of doctors will closely monitor the patients daily.

Notes of a musician

Kaithapram Damodaran Namboodiri made his entry into Malayalam Cinema as a lyrist with the hit song‘Devadundubi Ragalayam’ in the film ‘Ennennum Kannettante’, directed by Fazil. So far he has written lyrics for more than 300 films. He has also acted in many films playing roles of classical or semi-classical singers. The film ‘Sopanam’ directed by Jayaraj is based on the story and screenplay of Kaithapram. His son Deepankuran is an upcoming singer, and his brother Kaithapram Viswanathan Nambuthiri is a noted music director.

Kaithapram is planning his directorial debut in the film industry — the movie, on the rare friendship between an Indian and Pakistan soldier, is penned by him.





 
 
 
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