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Video: Horse sits on plane passenger's lap

Video: Horse sits on plane passengers lap

The horse was filmed sleeping on the woman's lap with its head sticking out in the aisle.



By Web Report

Published: Mon 2 Sep 2019, 6:11 PM

Last updated: Mon 2 Sep 2019, 8:21 PM

American Airlines passengers were left open-mouthed when they witnessed a woman board the plane with her emotional support miniature horse.
The horse was filmed sleeping on the woman's lap with its head sticking out in the aisle. The events were captured during a flight from Chicago to Omaha.
A Twitter user, Ewan Nowak,  posted the video along with a humorous note that read: 'At this time we would like to begin boarding with any active duty military, families traveling with children under the age of 3, and horses'.

 
 
 
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Another traveller filmed another video after landing in Omaha that showed the animal walking behind its owner at the airport. The traveller posted the video online and wrote: 'What a time to be alive. GTHO (get the hell out) with this. Where does this pony fit on the plane? Does she get her own row because anyone sitting in hers, it's going to be tight!!!'
 
 
 
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The US Department of Transport told CBS 62 that passengers are allowed to bring the creatures on board American aircrafts so long as they are designated as service animals, reported Daily Mail.
The department said in a statement: 'With respect to animal species, we indicated that we would focus our enforcement efforts on ensuring that the most commonly used service animals (dogs, cats, and miniature horses) are accepted for transport'.
The American Disabilities Act differentiates between service animals and emotional support animals which are commonly used to help calm the nerves of anxious travelers. Unlike emotional support animals, service animals must have special training to assist their disabled owners with specific tasks.


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