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Home > General
 
Unmasking the chilling conspiracy of global warming

13 July 2014

A tragedy turned an Indian chemistry graduate into a filmmaker. Now he wants to expose what he says 
is the global warming myth, 
reports Nivriti Butalia.

Zanane Rajsingh

Nine countries in the past four months. Not a bad record, especially when you consider that Zanane Rajsingh, a 26-year old filmmaker from Gujarat, first went abroad in January.

The Kolhapur-born chemistry graduate might have still remained a senior customer service representative at a knowledge-processing outsourcing job in Pune had it not been for a 16-minute short film he made about a bomb blast in the city.

In 2010, the laidback city, known for its film institute and relaxed lifestyle, suffered a trauma when a bomb exploded in a popular bakery, killing  17 people and injuring at least 60 more.

Rajsingh used to be at the German Bakery every Saturday and Sunday evening and he felt it could easily have been his life lost as well.

His film, A Candlelight Event, went on to win a series of awards. More importantly, the short film led to another film, avenues opened up for him and he wriggled into the film circuit.

His new film is a full-length feature, an American-Indian venture on climate change produced by US-based company Nanoland. The script is by Dr Rajeshkumar Acharya, Nanoland’s corporate advisor.

The preparation for the movie took time: Six months of reading to be convinced that global warming was a farce, as claimed by the script writer, Dr Acharya.

Rajsingh talks of glacial periods, and the hot and dusty Shamal winds.

“People think climate change is (due to) global warming. But global warming is a myth.”

That’s what the film talks about, the global warming ‘conspiracy’.

The first part of the film releases in January 2015. Currently, the director is on a packed schedule and constantly travelling.

Hong Kong, Singapore, Cuba, the US, Philippines — Rajsingh’s passport has been getting stamped furiously.

In January, on his first trip out of India  — when his family came to the airport to see him off — he was headed to Berastagi, a village in Indonesia.  There he climbed Mount Sibayak, a mountain 900m away from Mount Sinabung, one of 127 active volcanoes in Indonesia which erupted in 2010 after lying dormant for hundreds of years.

This January, Mount Sinabung erupted again, claiming at least 16 lives and displacing a village of 20,000.

Rajsingh and his team went up on the neighbouring peak to film the volcano’s surroundings.

The villages were completely grey, covered in ash. The team heard rumbles and saw yellow phosphoric sulphur flowing down. He remembers being overwhelmed and in tears while descending.

Since then, he’s shot the Lambert glaciers in Antarctica, the world’s biggest glacier, the Hubbard Glacier in Alaska, and geysers and orange lava in Hawaii. Awed as he was by all the natural beauty around him, Rajsingh was most touched by the 9/11 memorial in New York. As he approached the subway stop, he felt his heart beat faster.

He’s in Dubai for a fortnight to visit his younger brother and extended family and watch the Fifa World Cup with friends. A football enthusiast, he loves it here and has been playing friendly matches in Al Khail. He especially loves Barasti (the beach joint at the Meridien) “for the atmosphere that I don’t get where I come from”.

But even while here for fun and football, he’s shot a lot. He’s met scientists. And he’s learned that it’s expected to snow again in Ras Al Khaimah next winter. Fascinated by the northern Emirate, he wants to get that on film.

"Headed next to Japan and in August to Argentina to film parts of the Patagonia Glaciers, he says he feels proud to be able to see so much of the world, and so much of nature".

His family is getting used to him being on the move and no longer drive him to the international airport.

“Now I go and come by myself,” he says.

nivriti@khaleejtimes.com

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